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Occupational Therapy Week

Occupational Therapy Week


Every year in October, New Zealand Occupational Therapists celebrate Occupational Therapy

Week and World Occupational Therapy Day.

We are proud to announce that Te Wiki o Te Whakaora Ngangahau 2017 (Occupational Therapy Week 2017) is shining a light on Te Tika i roto i ngā Whāinga Wāhi mō te tangata (Occupational Justice) and Te Panonitanga Pāpori (Social Change).


It is a continuation of the Occupational Therapy Conference theme “Committing to Social Change Ngā tahitanga o te Tangata” held in Nelson in September 2017.


To help celebrate Occupational Therapy Week, 23-27 th October, and World Occupational Therapy day on 27 th October, a toolkit and resources has been developed by Occupational Therapy New Zealand Whakaora Ngangahau Aotearoa (OTNZ-WNA), to equip our Occupational Therapists to reach out to colleagues, ommunities, and the general public to help showcase some of the wonderful work they do.


On a daily basis, occupational therapists assist people to improve their well-being and quality of life. They treat injured, ill or disabled patients through the therapeutic use of everyday activities and help these patients develop, recover and improve the skills needed for daily living and working. Most people are unaware just how diverse occupational therapists are.


OTNZ-WNA is the professional association for occupational therapists in New Zealand.

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