News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Transplant hui first to be held in Hawke’s Bay

4 October 2019


For the first time in New Zealand, a transplant hui, to better inform Māori healthcare providers and influencers about organ donation, is to be held in Hawke’s Bay to support patients/whānau who face transplant conversations, or the receiving of a deceased organ.

Hawke’s Bay District Health Board transplant coordinator Merryn Jones, who is of Ngāti Rakaipaaka descent, spearheaded the hui, which has gained national industry attention.

Ms Jones says organ donation is an issue that disproportionately affects Māori due to many barriers which she believes could be overcome with better education and awareness.

“There are many barriers to transplant for patients with end stage renal disease that result in lower kidney transplant rates for Māori, compared with NZ Europeans.

“Cultural values, concern for wellbeing of potential donors, genetic issues within families, access to primary care, distrust of the medical system, poor health literacy, or financial problems to getting care, are just some of the barriers,” said Ms Jones.

Data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA) also showed “disturbing statistics” that painted a picture of inequity in accessing healthcare, she said.

“Māori represent nearly 79 per cent of the dialysis population in Hawke’s Bay and yet, of the 187 kidney transplants in New Zealand in 2017, only 23 (12.3%) of the recipients were Māori.

“The data also found that NZ Europeans were 4-8 times more likely to receive a transplant before needing dialysis (pre-emptive) than a non-European. Added to this, Māori have five times higher rates of renal failure compared with non-Māori, and two times higher rates of diabetes than non-Māori.”

Ms Jones said she hoped future statistics could be turned around by working more closely alongside Māori health services and influencers (i.e. Kaumatua).

“The hui is open to all – health providers and community support workers from post-Treaty organisations and Iwi groups, to Kaitakawaenga and Kaumatua who provide advice and support.

“We will explore Māori perspectives about organ donation and transplant. The hui will be strongly story-based, with people sharing their lived experience of transplant, and those who work in the field, providing information for everyone.

“It will generate discussion and provide information for health workers and support people to address some of the misinformation out there about transplants.”

The hui is free to attend and will be held at Te Taiwhenua o Heretaunga, 821 Orchard Road, Hastings on 16 October from 8:30 to 4pm. The hui is limited to 150 people.

Registrations can be made by emailing merryn.jones@hbdhb.govt.nz.

-ENDS-


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis: 1917's 1,000 Yard Stare

Sam Mendes has created a terrible and barbarous trek, one that we appreciate all the more for being catapulted right into the midst of this ear-splitting melee from the film's opening sequence. More>>


Floorball: NZ To Host World Cup Of Floorball In 2022

In a major coup for a minnow nation in the European-dominated sport of floorball, New Zealand has won the rights to host one of the sport’s marque international events. More>>

National Voyage Continues: Tuia 250 Ends

Tuia 250 has unleashed an unstoppable desire to keep moving forward and continue the kōrero about who we are, say the co-chairs of the Tuia 250 National Coordinating Committee, Dame Jenny Shipley and Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr. More>>

ALSO:

Te Papa: New Chief Executive From Its Own Staff

Courtney Johnston has been appointed as the new Chief Executive of Te Papa. Ms Johnston will take up the role in December 2019. Since its founding, Te Papa has had a dual leadership model, and as Tumu Whakarae|Chief Executive, Johnston will share the leadership with Kaihautū Dr Arapata Hakiwai. More>>

ALSO:

Over 150 Productions: NZ Fringe 2020 Has Launched

The upcoming festival will be held at 40 venues all over Wellington Region from 28 February to 21 March, and includes every genre possible—theatre, comedy, dance, music, clowning, cabaret, visual art, children’s shows and more! More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland