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Down Syndrome Advocate Joins Co-design Team For Project Mobilise

The New Zealand Down Syndrome Association congratulates Andrew Oswin for joining the co-design team for Project Mobilise.

Project Mobilise was launched recently by the Human Rights Commission to inspire social change.

Over the next few months, Project Mobilise will be working hard to understand attitudes surrounding disability – the stories, beliefs, and assumptions held by New Zealanders.

The project team aims to create a media campaign based on these insights to help people think differently about disability.

Andrew Oswin from Christchurch has been part of the leadership team of the NZSDA self-advocacy group STRIVE for many years.

He has also been an eloquent and passionate advocate for New Zealand people with Down syndrome on many national and international advisory groups.

NZDSA National Executive Officer Zandra Vaccarino has congratulated the Disability Rights Commissioner Paula Tesoriero for this much-needed initiative to shift and change attitudes towards disability in Aotearoa.

“The NZDSA will be supporting and promoting Project Mobilise as we believe that changing attitudes is crucial for addressing discrimination, so that all people with Down syndrome can enjoy the same rights as all citizens of New Zealand,” says Mrs Vaccarino.

“The NZDSA believes a national media campaign is vital to help people think differently about disability, to celebrate diversity is celebrated,” says Vaccarino.

She adds that Project Mobilise will create the space for all New Zealanders to reflect on their attitudes and to consider how we might contribute to dismantling barriers that disable people from having full access to their community.

To disrupt harmful narratives and help New Zealanders view disability in an entirely new way

the Human Rights Commission is working with creative agency Curative to better understand the stories, beliefs, and assumptions held by New Zealanders about disabled people and co-design a national campaign strategy to change those attitudes.

Project Mobilise is anchored in co-design, a human rights framework, and Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

The project aims will share power, enable authentic participation, prioritise relationships, and centre the perspectives and realities of disabled people.

Project Mobilise is working collaboratively with the disability sector, and wants the disability community to be a part of Project Mobilise.

Visit www.projectmobilise.co.nz to learn more and find out how you can take part.

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