News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Share The Joy Of Breastfeeding Say Child Health Organisations

New Zealand Breastfeeding Alliance (NZBA), the NZ College of Midwives and the Paediatric Society have joined forces to remind New Zealanders that breastfeeding should be a shared responsibility.

World Breastfeeding Week (WBW), which runs from 1-7 August, aims to highlight the huge benefits that breastfeeding can bring to both the health and welfare of babies, as well as a wider push for maternal health, focusing on good nutrition, poverty reduction and food security.

"In Aotearoa New Zealand around 80 percent of babies are exclusively breastfed on discharge from baby-friendly services. However, this percentage drops significantly by six weeks after birth, and at six months," said Paediatric Society President Nicola Austin.

“We’d like to see more babies being exclusively and fully breastfed for longer. In order to do this breastfeeding mothers need a supportive environment from immediately after birth when skin to skin and support to initiate breastfeeding are provided. Early health professional advice, as well as family and workplace support are important factors in how long a mother will breastfeed."

NZ College of Midwives Chief Executive Alison Eddy said, “Breastfeeding should be seen as a shared responsibility and support given wherever possible. We understand that busy working schedules, alongside the many other challenges that modern women face can mean that women don’t always feel that breastfeeding their child is something that is an accessible option to them. It’s important that mothers are given as much support as possible to breastfeed for at least six months to give their baby the best start in life.”

NZ Breastfeeding Alliance Executive Officer Jane Cartwright notes that as part of World Breastfeeding Week organisations will be running a series of events featuring informative live chats, pre-recorded interviews with experts, and live Zooms with parents discussing their breastfeeding journeys and tips for overcoming challenges.

“As we prepare to celebrate, share knowledge and ideas, take a moment for yourself to reflect on what World Breastfeeding Week means to you and how you are entangling that passion into your everyday mahi of protecting, supporting, and advocating for breastfeeding parents and their tamariki.”


The Virtual BIG Latch On is happening on Friday and Saturday (6 and 7 August). Head over to the website to get involved.

The Government recently launched a National Breastfeeding Strategy, with the aim to protect, promote and support breastfeeding in New Zealand Aotearoa.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 


Howard Davis: Emerald Fennell's Promising Young Woman'


The Guardian needed not one, but three reviews to do justice to Fennell's unsettling approach, which indicates exactly how ambiguous and controversial its message really is. More>>


Howard Davis: Jill Trevelyan's Rita Angus

Although Angus has become one of Aotearoa’s best-loved painters, the story of her life remained little known and poorly understood before Jill Trevelyan's acclaimed and revelatory biography, which won the Non Fiction Award at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2009, and has now been republished by Te Papa press. More>>

Howard Davis: The Back of the Painting

Painting conservators are the forensic pathologists of the art world. While they cannot bring their subjects back to life, they do provide fascinating insights into the precise circumstances of a painting's creation, its material authenticity, and constructive methodology. More>>


Howard Davis: Black Panthers on the Prowl

A passionate and gripping political drama from Shaka King, this is an informative and instructive tale of human frailty that centers around the charismatic Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton, who was murdered at the age of twenty-one during a police raid. More>>

Howard Davis: Controlling the High Ground

Stephen Johnson's raw and angry film not only poses important questions with scrupulous authenticity, but also provides a timely reminder of the genocidal consequences of casual bigotry and xenophobia. More>>

Howard Davis: Dryzabone - Robert Conolly's The Dry

After the terrible devastation caused by last year’s bushfires, which prompted hundreds of Australians to shelter in the ocean to escape incineration and destroyed uncountable amounts of wildlife, The Dry has been released during a totally different kind of dry spell. More>>


Howard Davis: Hit the Road, Jack - Chloé Zhao's Nomadland

Nomadland is perhaps the ultimately 'road' movie as it follows a group of dispossessed and disenfranchised vagabonds who find a form of communal refuge in camp sites and trailer parks after the economic contraction of 2008. More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland