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Clark Has Security Worries, But Wont Move

“I’m not selling my home,” said Prime Minister Helen Clark Today, after speculation - partly fueled by her own comments - that she would move, following a Sunday Star Times article which published a map detailing where Miss Clark lives, and a photograph of her house.

Miss Clark described the article as “gutter journalism.”

She said that although she would not sell her home, she had security concerns. She said she had had bottles left on her lawn, and men banging on her door and calling out to her at 5am. She said publication of her address would only encourage people on the lunatic fringe to seek her out. “It can only get worse,” she said.

She rejected suggestions that anyone could find her address if they wanted to, saying there were a lot of H. Clarks in the telephone book, and it would take considerable effort to track her down.

The Sunday Star Times article drew attention to a submission Miss Clark made opposing an application to expand an existing 27 room boarding house in her Mt Eden neighbourhood into a 61 room boarding house.

The Eden Park Neighbours’ Association said today that the article incorrectly described the proposal as a “home for the needy,” when it was in fact a commercial proposal targeting an upmarket clientele, such as international students.

Miss Clark said she made the submission because she wanted to preserve the quiet, Edwardian character of her neighbourhood.

National Housing Minister Tony Ryall said the Prime Minister has been caught out as a snob in making the submission.

However, Miss Clarks views mirror those of many in her community. The Eden Park Neigbours association said they were disgusted that a much respected local MP is being attacked for getting involved in community issues.

Ends

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