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Feedback: Economy Commentary - Amorality

In This Edition: Does the economy need to be talked up or down like a manic-depressive? - “Amoral From The Top Down" Should Be Compulsory Reading

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Does the economy need to be talked up or down like a manic-depressive?

Dear Sir,

I found it slightly distasteful to read Paulo Politico’s column ‘Beginners' Guide To Talking Down Economy’ and it’s use of that most noxious commentariat cliché, and incidentally a very cheap ad hominem attack.

Muriel Newman and I wouldn’t agree on the time of day if we were sharing a watch. But I find it slightly ironic that Paulo does exactly what he criticises Newman and other Opposition politicians of: carefully selecting statistics that suit his ideological bias.

Unemployment and job creation figures are notoriously difficult to measure accurately – or compare to other nations with different economic, legislative and policy frameworks. Any responsible commentator should also be sensitive to historical changes whether administrative or political in motivation.

I would respectfully suggest that commentators who feel the need to “talk the economy up” are as dangerous and irresponsible as politicians who allegedly “talk the economy down”. The long-term effects on American workers of Enron accounting and the dot-con bubble shows the urgent need for real diversity of economic opinion, healthy scepticism and analysis of the ideological assumptions behind the illusory objectivity of economic data, and (dare I say it) more journalism and less propaganda.

Craig Ranapia

"What I do may not be reputable, but I am. In this town, I'm the leper with the most fingers." The Two Jakes, Robert Towne

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“Amoral From The Top Down" Should Be Compulsory Reading

William Moloney's article "Amoral From The Top Down" should be compulsory reading for ALL New Zealanders.

His summing up of Helen Clark over the Paintergate affair is so right. She should have and still should resign. By refusing to resign she is now an example of the amoral society.

Politicians act in their own interest, not in the moral or peoples interest.

Sally McIntyre
Gore

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