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Link: Hinckley & Bush Families Were Close Friends

Hinckley And Bush Families Were Close Friends


By Tom Flocco

For Full Story See…
http://www.tomflocco.com/

Everyone knows who John Hinckley, Jr. is. This youngest Hinckley son is now being permitted unsupervised visits within the Washington, DC metropolitan area--away from his mental facility, after nearly killing President Reagan in 1981. But a much more interesting subject is, who is John Hinckley, Sr.?

In 1980, Hinckley Sr. was a Texas oilman who, the records show, strove mightily to get fellow Texas oilman George H.W. Bush the Republican nomination for president. The Bushes and the Hinckleys were frequent dinner companions.

The effort to make Bush Sr. president in 1980 failed; but he and his friend and backer Hinckley Sr. got the next best thing - the "heartbeat away from the presidency" office of Vice-President of the United States. A couple months later, Hinckley Jr. shot Reagan, and Bush Sr. very nearly did become president at that time, after all. Curiously, only one time was it announced on the news about the connections between the Bush and Hinckley families: An almost bewildered John Chancellor on NBC Nightly News reported "the bizarre coincidence" that Vice President Bush's son, Neil, and Scott Hinckley had dinner plans for March 31, 1981 -- now cancelled, of course.

On the morning of March 30 [the day of the Reagan assassination attempt by John Hinckley, Jr.], three representatives of the U.S. Department of Energy told Scott Hinckley, John Hinckley Jr.'s older brother and Vanderbilt's vice president of operations, that auditors had uncovered evidence of pricing violations on crude oil sold by the company from 1977 through 1980. The auditors announced that the federal government was considering a penalty of two million dollars. [This, on the same day that his brother John--the youngest son of Vice President Bush's close friend--attempted the assassination!] Scott Hinckley reportedly requested "several hours to come up with an explanation" of the serious overcharges. The meeting ended a little more than an hour before John Hinckly Jr. shot President Reagan.

[Read other startling facts uncovered by a college professor and Rhodes Scholar who charges the media with keeping significant information from the public that it has a right to know.]

COMPLETE STORY:

http://www.tomflocco.com/


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