Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Wasserman: Kerry Must (Again) Make Love, Not War

John Kerry Must (Again) Make Love, Not War


by Harvey Wasserman
September 20, 2004
From: http://www.freepress.org/columns/display/7/2004/951

This presidential campaign is stuck in the sixties and seventies, right where it belongs.

That's when the preppy draft dodger George W. Bush thought the Beatles were ''weird'', possibly because, as Kitty Kelly says, he heard them too often on cocaine. He was also the quintessential Chickenhawk, content to see others die in a war he backed but ducked.

That was Vietnam. Now---Oops, he did it again---it's Iraq.

Nixon and Henry Kissinger knew full well in 1972 that the Vietnam war was unwinnable. They looked into calling off the election, broke into Democratic Party headquarters, dirty tricked George McGovern, then drunk drove the nation right into a jungle quagmire.

In the age of oil and global warming, that fever swamp has become desert quicksand. But the catastrophe's the same, except now we're also burdened with the last one.

Bush seems morally and mentally incapable of doing anything but plunging deeper, not only into Iraq but into fiscal, ecological, moral and spiritual psychosis.

Bush's Foxist media calls this "resolute leadership." But Iraq is exactly as unwinnable as Vietnam.

There's only one possible outcome---the Americans will leave. Off the rooftop of an embassy. In unphotographed body bags. With terror bombs exploding. With pipelines in flames. With the economy in tatters. With fundamentalists in charge in both Baghdad and Washington.

The only question in Iraq---like Vietnam---is how many people will die and how many billions squandered before the defeat can no longer be air brushed or blamed on peace activists.

John Kerry could have avoided Vietnam. But he went, earned his medals, then came home and became a true hero. The incredibly brave, painful work of those Vietnam Vets Against the War ranks amongst the greatest American acts of patriotic valor and service.

Today the realest human drama in this sorry presidential campaign is a nation---and world---desperate to see John Kerry's inner anti-warrior fight again.

Kerry's Senate vote authorizing Bush to attack Iraq was a terrible mistake. When will he finally fling it over the White House fence?

The Democrats' criticisms have sharpened as this psychotic war's illegality, arrogance and unwinnability have become as overwhelmingly obvious as Vietnam after Tet.

So has the fact that George W. Bush is the worst president this nation has ever seen, from civil rights and liberties to the ecology, economy, military, security, global relations, global warming...you name it. The laws of nature and karma may ultimately bring him down, as they did Richard Nixon. But who will give the definitive push?

John Kerry became a hero correctly renouncing a war that poisoned America's soul and drove this nation to the brink of ruin.

Iraq is about to finish the job. And once again, John Kerry has a line he must cross.

Time is running out. And the whole world is watching.

- ***** -

HARVEY WASSERMAN'S HISTORY OF THE U.S. is available at http://www.harveywasserman.com/ . He is co-author, with Bob Fitrakis, of the newly published IMPRISON GEORGE W. BUSH http://www.freepress.org


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 


Dunne Speaks: Robertson's Budget Gamble On Treasury
The popular test of the success or failure of Grant Robertson’s fifth Budget will be its impact on the soaring cost of living. In today’s climate little else matters. Because governments come and governments go – about every six to seven years on average since 1945 – getting too focused on their long-term fiscal aspirations is often pointless... More>>

Keith Rankin: Liberal Democracy In The New Neonationalist Era: The Three 'O's
The proposed ‘New Zealand Income Insurance Scheme’ (‘the scheme’) has attracted strong debate among the more left-wing and liberal groupings, within New Zealand-Aotearoa. This debate should be seen as a positive rather than negative tension because of the opportunity to consider and learn from the implications and sharpen advocacy... More>>

Dunne Speaks: Words Matter, Prime Minister
Words matter, especially when uttered by politicians. History is littered with examples of careless or injudicious words uttered by politicians coming back to haunt them, often at the most awkward of times. During the 1987 election campaign, when electoral reform was a hot issue, Prime Minister David Lange promised to have a referendum on the electoral system... More>>


Digitl: Infrastructure Commission wants digital strategy
Earlier this month Te Waihanga, New Zealand’s infrastructure commission, tabled its first Infrastructure Strategy: Rautaki Hanganga o Aotearoa. Te Waihanga describes its document as a road map for a thriving New Zealand... More>>


Binoy Kampmark: Leaking For Roe V Wade
The US Supreme Court Chief Justice was furious. For the first time in history, the raw judicial process of one of the most powerful, and opaque arms of government, had been exposed via media – at least in preliminary form. It resembled, in no negligible way, the publication by WikiLeaks of various drafts of the Trans-Pacific Partnership... More>>




The Conversation: Cheaper food comes with other costs – why cutting GST isn't the answer

As New Zealand considers the removal of the goods and services tax (GST) from food to reduce costs for low income households, advocates need to consider the impact cheap food has on the environment and whether there are better options to help struggling families... More>>