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UQ Wire: More FBI 9/11 Whistleblowers Emerge

Distribution via the Unanswered Questions Wire
http://www.unansweredquestions.org/ .

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At a Loss for Words


FBI's translation scandal heats up; more whistle-blowers emerge.
By James Ridgeway
The Village Voice
Tuesday 30 November 2004

FOR FULL STORY SEE…
http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0448/mondo2.php

Among the unanswered questions of 9-11 is the part played by the FBI in handling the various tips and information pouring through its translation section at the Washington, D.C., field office. It is in this division that certified language specialists with top secret security clearances handle the most sensitive information, from wiretaps to face-to-face interview translations between an investigating agent and a suspect. The translators often have inordinate power. Because of their expertise (or rather, the limited number of languages spoken by their bosses), translators often make the decisions on which cases to fully translate and which not to bother with. Errors can creep in: Translators may misunderstand a dialect and thus lose the meaning or context of information. On occasion, some translators' grasp of English is so poor that they cannot convey nuances of the speakers.

This division is already under fire from the Justice Department's inspector general and whistle-blowers, most notably Sibel Edmonds, who was fired from her job as a Farsi translator when she protested the way the work was being handled. Since Edmonds began speaking out, others have come forward.

A November 8 letter to the Justice Department from Senate Judiciary chair Charles Grassley and ranking minority member Patrick Leahy told of one such case: "A current member of the staff of Senator Grassley has continued to have discussions over the past year with a current contract linguist for the FBI. The allegations made by this current employee are very troubling. Specifically, this employee articulated that translators are often deficient in their abilities to translate into English. The employee noted that some translators who are presently employed by the FBI or who are employed by contractors may in fact fail the English test, but still be provided a passing grade surreptitiously because of personal contacts among the translator staff. This employee also noted that supervisors charged with ensuring that materials are translated accurately are often deficient in their own translating abilities."

FOR FULL STORY SEE…
http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0448/mondo2.php

STANDARD DISCLAIMER FROM UQ.ORG: UnansweredQuestions.org does not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the above article. We present this in the interests of research -for the relevant information we believe it contains. We hope that the reader finds in it inspiration to work with us further, in helping to build bridges between our various investigative communities, towards a greater, common understanding of the unanswered questions which now lie before us.

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