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Amman Bombings: More Holes in the Official Story

Global Research Feature Article

The Al-Zarqawi 11/9 Amman Bombings: More Holes in the Official Story


by Michel Chossudovsky
November 15, 2005
GlobalResearch.ca

The "Al Qaeda in Iraq" website which allegedly claimed responsibility for the Amman bombings, states that the attacks were directed against Israelis, members of Western intelligence agencies and their Shiite accomplices:

"[the hotels are] a backyard for the enemies of religion, the Jews and Crusaders, and a dirty hideout for the nation's apostate traitors, as well as a safe haven for the intelligence services of the infidels, where they plot their conspiracies against Muslims."

According to The New York Times (10 Nov)

"The group's statement said the hotels had been attacked because they were favored locations for Western and Israeli intelligence agencies and were used as ''backdoor safe houses'' for the Shiite -dominated Iraqi government."

The attacks were said to be in response to "the conspiracy against the Sunnis whose blood and honour were shed by Crusaders and the Shiites." (quoted in The Statesman, India, 12 November 2005)

Upon reviewing the list of the 57 victims, however, we can confirm that:

1) There was not a single Israeli casualty. According to Haaretz and The Los Angeles Times, the Israelis had been evacuated prior to the blast. (see our earlier report on foreknowledge of the attacks)

2) With regard to the "Western and Israeli intelligence agencies", there were no reported Israeli or US intelligence officials among the victims. In fact quite the opposite: two senior Palestinian intelligence officials were killed in the blast including Maj.-Gen. Bashir Nafeh, head of the Palestinian Authority's military intelligence and Col. Abed Allun, a high-ranking Preventive Security forces official. Both men were firm opponents of the US led war in Iraq.

3) Zarqawi is a Sunni. Al Qaeda in Iraq is described by the Western media as waging terrorist attacks against Shiites, with a view to creating divisions between Sunnis and Shiites. In the words of the NYT (11 November 2005)

If there has been evidence of disagreement between Mr. Zarqawi and the Qaeda leadership, it has been over the question of whether it is appropriate for the Sunni Arab-led movement to carry out attacks on Iraqi Shiites.

In his 2004 letter, Mr. Zarqawi recommended the tactic as a device to incite Sunni- Shiite tensions that might help to broaden the militants' appeal among Sunnis. A letter that American forces in Iraq attributed to Mr. bin Laden's deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri, warned that such a tactic might undermine broader Islamic support for the jihadist movement.

But the attacks did not target Shiites, who are allegedly considered by Al Zarqawi as "heretics". The vast majority of the 57 victims of the blasts were Sunni Muslims.

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© Copyright Michel Chossudovsky, GlobalResearch.ca, 2005

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