Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Liam Ashley Report: Findings And PDF

Liam Ashley Report: Findings And PDF

In Late August 2006 Liam Ashley, 17, was assaulted in a Chubb security van as it was driven to the remand prison in Mt Eden, Auckland. Liam Ashley was in the van with George Charlie Baker, who has pled guilty to murder.

This morning the Department of Corrections released:

The Investigation of the circumstances surrounding the death at Auckland Public Hospital of Prisoner Liam John Ashley of Auckland Central Remand Prison on 25 August 2006

  • Liam Ashley Investigation PDF
  • FINDINGS

    Key finding

    7. The death of Liam Ashley following his being assaulted while under escort from the North Shore District Court to Auckland Central Remand Prison on 24 August 2006 could have been avoided by a more rigorous application of Corrections Regulation (2005) 179 (1) (b), which states that all prsioners under the age of 18 years must, when outside a prison, be kept separate from prisoners who are 18 years or over where practicable. The process by which the prisoners were allocated to the various compartments within the escort vehicle had developed over time and had become an established practice accepted by both Chubb and the Department of Corrections. The practice was deficient in that it placed insufficient emphasis on the speeration of youth and adult prisoners.

    Specific Findings

    8. The decision to place Liam in the front of the Chubb vehicle CAN05 with two adult prisoners was the decision of CBEO (A). This officer went to some lengths to make an appropriate decision. This decision was based on his training and understanding of the balance of priorities between security and safety. This included the weight that was placed on the requirement to keep youths separate where practicable as opposed to the recommended accommodation limits for each vehicle compartment, or the security risks involved in moving prisoners around the vehicle during the various stops along the route.

    9. There were other options available for configuring the escort that would have enabled Liam to be seperated from adult prisoners for all but one section of the journey from ACRP to North Shore District Court on the morning of 24 August 2006, and for the entire return journey that evening.

    10. The information provided to Chubb about Liam was not complete. Liam's actiove alert entered on IOMS (as a result of the Prison Youth Vulnerability Scale (PYVS) assessment) indicated that he was a vulnerable youth. This was not brought to the attention of Chubb by ACRP. In the Investigation's opinion the alert was relevant for Chubb's consideration, and may have influenced Chubb's decision in relation to their application in Liam's case of regulation 179.

    11. The written information provided by ACRP to Chubb on prsioner Georg Charlie Baker was partially inaccurate. It omitted relevant documentation (observation form) that would have alerted Chubb to the fact that Baker was on 15 minute observations and therefore required to be seperated as an 'At risk Prisoner in accordance with the contract, Schedule 2, Service Description 6.1.9 – Seperation of Groups of prisoners.

    12. The contributing factors to the inaccurate and omitted information provided by ACRP to Chubb staff for Baker are as follows:

    - A voluntary Protective Segregation alert was not deactivated by Auckland Prison upon his transfer to ACRP

    - The escorting an At risk Prisoner form (C.02.01.F1) was completed by an inexperienced staff member on Night watchwho entered the incorrect type of segregation from the alert information.

    - The ACRP Receiving Officer who completed the hand-over process was not advised that baker was on 15 minute observations, therefore he did not verbally pass this information on to the Chubb escorting officers.

    - ACRP Receiving Office staff did not carry out 15 minute observations on Baker while waiting in the Receiving Office on the morning of 24 August 2006 in accordance with national requirements PPM B. 14 – Prisoners at Risk to Themselves.

    - The ACRP Court list did not record Baker's status ans security type as remand & unclassified.

    12. Liam qualified for the group 'Prisoner at Risk' in accordance with the contract, Schedule 2, Service Description 6.1.9 – Separation of Groups of Prisoners as defined in the Standards & Practices – A.O3 as a 'Youth under 20 years of age'. He therefore should have been separated from all other groups of prisoners in terms of that specific contract requirement.

    13. The non seperation of Baker as a Prisoner at Risk in accordance with the contract requirements (schedule 2, Service Description 6.1.9 - Separation of Groups of Prisoners) provided the ability for Liam and Baker to communicate during transportation both to and from Court on 24 August 2006.

    13. CBEO (A) & (B) did not observe Liam, Baker and Prisoner E in the front compartment from henderson Police Station to ACRP on the afternoon escort on 24 August 2006-12-11 The investigation is of the opinion that the route travelled and the times taken were of aprropriate foir the needs of the escort.


    ENDS

    © Scoop Media

     
     
     
    Top Scoops Headlines

     


    Ian Powell: Are we happy living in Handy's Age of Unreason?

    On 19 June the Sunday Star Times published my column on the relationship between the Labour government’s stewardship of Aotearoa New Zealand’s health system and the outcome of the next general election expected to be around September-October 2023: Is the health system an electoral sword of Damocles for Labour... More>>


    The First Attack On The Independents: Albanese Hobbles The Crossbench
    It did not take long for the new Australian Labor government to flex its muscle foolishly in response to the large crossbench of independents and small party members of Parliament. Despite promising a new age of transparency and accountability after the election of May 21, one of the first notable acts of the Albanese government was to attack the very people who gave voice to that movement. Dangerously, old party rule, however slim, is again found boneheaded and wanting... More>>


    Binoy Kampmark: Predictable Monstrosities: Priti Patel Approves Assange’s Extradition
    The only shock about the UK Home Secretary’s decision regarding Julian Assange was that it did not come sooner. In April, Chief Magistrate Senior District Judge Paul Goldspring expressed the view that he was “duty-bound” to send the case to Priti Patel to decide on whether to extradite the WikiLeaks founder to the United States to face 18 charges, 17 grafted from the US Espionage Act of 1917... More>>


    Dunne Speaks: Roe V. Wade Blindsides National

    Momentum is everything in politics, but it is very fragile. There are times when unexpected actions can produce big shifts and changes in the political landscape. In 2017, for example, the Labour Party appeared headed for another hefty defeat in that year’s election until the abrupt decision of its then leader to step aside just weeks before the election. That decision changed the political landscape and set in train the events which led to Labour being anointed by New Zealand First to form a coalition government just a few weeks later... More>>

    Digitl: Infrastructure Commission wants digital strategy
    Earlier this month Te Waihanga, New Zealand’s infrastructure commission, tabled its first Infrastructure Strategy: Rautaki Hanganga o Aotearoa. Te Waihanga describes its document as a road map for a thriving New Zealand... More>>


    Binoy Kampmark: Leaking For Roe V Wade
    The US Supreme Court Chief Justice was furious. For the first time in history, the raw judicial process of one of the most powerful, and opaque arms of government, had been exposed via media – at least in preliminary form. It resembled, in no negligible way, the publication by WikiLeaks of various drafts of the Trans-Pacific Partnership... More>>