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Karim Sahai Images: WOMAD New Zealand 2007

Karim Sahai Images: WOMAD New Zealand 2007


WOMAD New Zealand -
New Caledonia's Celenod. Image: Karim
Sahai
Click to enlarge

New Caledonia's Celenod presented a kanak dances workshop; a very popular hit with Womad participants.

On the evenings of March 16 – 18, the WOMAD festival returned to New Plymouth.

The event featured performances of contemporary world music from 21 countries. Among the more than 400 performers, international acts such as percussionist Bill Cobham, tango ensemble Gotan Project rubbed shoulders with New Zealanders including Don McGlashan and The Seven Sisters, Maori electronica group Wai, Hollie Smith and Whirimako Black. As well as the music performances the festival also offered workshops with many of the artists and shopping at a range of stalls.

In February organisers announced that WOMAD New Zealand would be an annual event from this year on.

Scoop contributor Karim Sahai was there to capture the World of Music and Dance in photography.

WOMAD New Zealand Website
Karim Sahai Photography

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WOMAD New Zealand -
Rt Hon. Helen Clark. Image: Karim Sahai
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A welcome speech by Rt Hon. Helen Clark marks the start of Womad 2007. The even will be held yearly in Taranaki from 2008.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Mahotella Queens. Image: Karim Sahai
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South Africa's singing Mahotella Queens bring bring explosive vocals to Womad, for the first time.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Mahotella Queens' Hilda Tloublata. Image: Karim
Sahai
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Mahotella Queens' Hilda Tloublata.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Guo Yue (China). Image: Karim Sahai
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Guo Yue (China) performs a bamboo flute concerto of chinese classical melodies.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Pandit Shivkumar Sharma (India). Image: Karim
Sahai
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Pandit Shivkumar Sharma (India) is a master of the 100-string 'santoor'.

WOMAD New Zealand -
The Gotan Project. Image: Karim Sahai
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The Gotan Project, a musical franco-argentinian musical collaboration, on Pukekura park's Bowl stage.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Femi Kuti and The Positive Force. Image: Karim
Sahai
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Femi Kuti and The Positive Force's hot afrobeat performance contrasted with the cool temperatures of the night.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Tibet's Gyuto Monks. Image: Karim Sahai
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Tibet's Gyuto Monks chant sacred mantras (prayers)

WOMAD New Zealand -
Tibet's Gyuto Monks. Image: Karim Sahai
Click to enlarge

WOMAD New Zealand -
Etran Finawatra (Niger). Image: Karim
Sahai
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The group Etran Finawatra (Niger) presented tuareg and wodaabe musical cultures.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Pukekura Park's Bowl stage. Image: Karim
Sahai
Click to enlarge

Pukekura Park's Bowl stage

WOMAD New Zealand -
Wetr (Lifou island, New Caledonia). Image: Karim
Sahai
Click to enlarge

Wetr (Lifou island, New Caledonia). The Kanak worlds of the visible and invisible is represented in Wetr's dances.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Ensemble Shanbehzadeh. Image: Karim Sahai
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Ensemble Shanbehzadeh (Iran). The father and son duo featured traditional music from Iran's Bushehr region.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Ensemble Shanbehzadeh. Image: Karim Sahai
Click to enlarge

Naghib Shanbehzadeh's demonstrates breathtaking musical skills on Brooklands stage.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Ensemble Shanbehzadeh. Image: Karim Sahai
Click to enlarge

WOMAD New Zealand -
Salif Keita. Image: Karim Sahai
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The legendary Salif Keita and his band (Mali).

WOMAD New Zealand -
Salif Keita. Image: Karim Sahai
Click to enlarge

Salif Keita's solo performance on the Bowl stage.

WOMAD New Zealand -
Salif Keita. Image: Karim Sahai
Click to enlarge

Salif Keita's artistic ingenuity and charismatic presence has made him the forefront figure of west african music for several decades

WOMAD New Zealand -
Samba Sunda (Indonesia). Image: Karim
Sahai
Click to enlarge

Samba Sunda (Indonesia) presented a unique brand of traditional and indonesian sounds.

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