Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Tears As Friends Locked Up & Sent To Auckland

Tears As Friends Locked Up & Sent To Auckland


By Julie Webb-Pullman

Wellington District Court was today the scene of outrage, incredulity and tears, when four peace activists were again denied bail, and remanded by Judge Bruce Davidson in custody for transfer to appear for a further hearing in the Auckland District Court 1st and 2nd November. Name suppression continues.

Judge Davidson also said he expected in normal course of events for another bail application to be heard within a month for the accused. This is the only fact concerning his decision that is allowed to be reported.

While Scoop is unable to report on the content of submissions it would be fair observe that that counsel for the accused took considerable exception to much of the reasoning given by the crown for continued detention.

It is not known at this stage whether the bail decision will be appealed.

A crowd of over a hundred had arrived by 10.30am this morning hoping for one of the 40 or so seats in the public gallery. Those early enough to get one were soon thrown out, as the judge ordered the court cleared for submissions by counsel.

Unlike Tame Iti’s whanau, who were permitted to hug and greet him at his bail hearing, family members of the Wellington accused were banished along with everyone else, with no opportunity to give personal support.

Undeterred, they and the accused’ friends, supporters and other concerned members of the public maintained a vigil both outside the courtroom, and the Court building.

By lunchtime it was clear that this was going to be an all-day affair, giving many cause for hope. The mood was still upbeat, with many increasingly hopeful that basic principles of justice would prevail, that people with no previous convictions or histories of breaches of court orders would be remanded at large, as the law directs.

However, several remained skeptical of such an outcome, saying the scope of the surveillance and detention operation called “Operation 8” has been so surreal that it was no longer possible to apply normal analysis.

When the court reconvened at 2pm so did family members and supporters, but they were again denied admission, and continued their vigil outside. Spirits rose shortly after 3pm, when the judge retired to consider his decision, announcing he would hand it down at 4.15pm.

Most remained, hopeful of at least being permitted to hear the decision, if not celebrate their release on remand. One of the lawyers even asked for this at the outset. There appeared to be an expectation – among the lawyers - that at least some of the accused would be granted bail.

A little after 4.30pm it was clear there was to be no cause for celebration – the Judge announced to media alone that he would permit publication of the decision only (no reasons or submissions or indeed anything at all except the fact of a bail hearing and of it failing).

He remanded all defendants in custody and ordered their transfer to Auckland District Court for a hearing on 1 November, without prejudice and subject to appeal and review.

Family and friends were devastated, and supporters and members of the public stunned and outraged.

One activist said having worked with them in some of the same movements, she is really shocked, and fears that it could happen to any of them. “When everyone’s getting angry and shouting and wanting to break things, they [the defendants] were planting community gardens.”

Audio clips of responses from supporters will be added to this article shortly.

*************

Julie Webb-Pullman is a Wellington based writer and journalist.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Binoy Kampmark: Budget Cockups In The Time Of Coronavirus: Reporting Errors And Australia’s JobKeeper Scheme

Hell has, in its raging fires, ringside seats for those who like their spreadsheets. The seating, already peopled by those from human resources, white collar criminals and accountants, becomes toastier for those who make errors with those spreadsheets. ... More>>


The Dig - COVID-19: Just Recovery

The COVID-19 crisis is compelling us to kick-start investment in a regenerative and zero-carbon future. We were bold enough to act quickly to stop the virus - can we now chart a course for a just recovery? More>>

The Conversation: Are New Zealand's New COVID-19 Laws And Powers Really A Step Towards A Police State?

Reaction to the New Zealand government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and resultant lockdown has ranged from high praise to criticism that its actions were illegal and its management chaotic. More>>


Keith Rankin: Universal Versus Targeted Assistance, A Muddled Dichotomy

The Commentariat There is a regular commentariat who appear on places such as 'The Panel' on Radio New Zealand (4pm on weekdays), and on panels on television shows such as Newshub Nation (TV3, weekends) and Q+A (TV1, Mondays). Generally, these panellists ... More>>

Jelena Gligorijevic: (Un)lawful Lockdown And Government Accountability

As the Government begins to ease the lockdown, serious questions remain about the lawfulness of these extraordinary measures. Parliament’s Epidemic Response Committee has indicated it will issue summonses for the production of legal advice about the ... More>>


Caitlin Johnstone: Do You Consent To The New Cold War?

The world's worst Putin puppet is escalating tensions with Russia even further, with the Trump administration looking at withdrawal from more nuclear treaties in the near future. In addition to planning on withdrawing from the Open Skies Treaty ... More>>


Binoy Kampmark: Why Thinking Makes It So: Donald Trump’s Obamagate Fixation

The “gate” suffix has been wearing thin since the break-in scandal that gave it its birth. Since Watergate, virtually anything dubious and suggestive, and much more besides, is suffixed. Which brings us to the issue of President Donald Trump’s ... More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Ethics (and Some Of The Economics) Of Lifting The Lockdown

As New Zealand passes the half-way mark towards moving out of Level Four lockdown, the trade-offs involved in life-after-lockdown are starting to come into view. All very well for National’s finance spokesperson Paul Goldsmith to claim that “The number one priority we have is to get out of the lockdown as soon as we can”…Yet as PM Jacinda Ardern pointed out a few days ago, any crude trade-off between public health and economic well-being would be a false choice... More>>


Binoy Kampmark: Brutal Choices: Anders Tegnell And Sweden’s Herd Immunity Goal

If the title of epidemiological czar were to be created, its first occupant would have to be Sweden’s Anders Tegnell. He has held sway in the face of sceptics and concern that his “herd immunity” approach to COVID-19 is a dangerous, and breathtakingly ... More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Trans-Tasman Bubble, And The Future Of Airlines

As the epidemiologists keep on saying, a trans-Tasman bubble will require having in place beforehand a robust form of contact tracing, of tourists and locals alike - aided by some kind of phone app along the lines of Singapore’s TraceTogether ... More>>

 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog