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Gaza Convoy Photo Essay (2): Rafah to Gaza

Gaza Convoy Photo Essay (2): Rafah to Gaza
Including Audio Of Speech At Gaza Border from Kevin Ovenden


Images & Audio by Julie Webb Pullman

Second part of three part photo essay Al-Arish to Gaza


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Through the gates



  • Viva Palestina Kevin Ovenden Speech at the Rafah border - Audio of Viva Palestina Convoy organizing committee member Kevin Ovenden's speech at the Rafah border crossing as the convoy made history and crossed into Gaza bringing $5 million of aid and a large number of ambulances to the besieged Gazan Palestinians.


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    and into no-man's-land between Egypt and Gaza



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    where even the cops welcome you,


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    and Palestinian women embrace their convoy sisters, crying


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    or smiling

    but none so broadly as Zaher Birawai, whose brilliant skills saw not only the convoy, but also himself, banned only days earlier, enter Gaza through Egypt.


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    After speeches from various dignitaries it was back on the road for
    the 40km drive to Gaza city.

    where Patrick


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    and I farewelled our 'home' and handed it over to Palestinians,


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    and joined the others preparing to get on the bus to our hotel.

    (continuing…. )

    *************

    Julie Webb-Pullman (click to view previous articles) is a New Zealand based freelance writer who has reported for Scoop since 2003. She was selected to be part of the Kiwi contingent on the Viva Palestina Convoy - a.k.a. Kia Ora Gaza. Send Feedback to julie@scoop.co.nz


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