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UNDERNEWS: December 6, 2012

UNDERNEWS: December 6, 2012

Since 1964, the news while there's still time to do something about it

THE PROGRESSIVE REVIEW

Obama's latest sellout to the One Percent
Brian Schweitzer: bright light, dark horse
The changing city: Granny flats and corner stores
The real Hillary: another deal
More than a quarter of TV weather forecasters think climate change is a scam
Judge rules Detroit mass police raid illegal
Study: Oil clearning dispersants made matters worse
Morning Line: Privatizing values
Mall Santa fired for being too grumpy
How 7 historic figures overcame depression without doctors

Culture
Dealing with copyright the way it was originally intended

Music
One German household in three has a musical instrument in the living room. But many sit there idle and do not get played, according to a new survey.Only one in six households – has an active musician, and that’s down from 26% just four years ago.

Politics
17 bills that likely would have passed the Senate if the Republicans hadn't fillbustered them

Ecology
Hydrogen could help cut emissions and boost wind and solar power
World Bank: Middle East, African Countries to Be Hardest Hit by Climate Change

Media
Bill Moyers: FCC May Give Murdoch a Very Merry Christmas - Two of the Last Big Newspapers in America

Labor
Organizing low pay workers

Schools
Inside Finnish education

Polls
58% say pot should be legalized
Second poll finds two third of those under 30 favor legalization while only 35% of those 65 and older do

On campus
Average SAT score (out of 2400) of students from households with an income below $20,000: 1322 . . . From households with an income above $200,000: 1722 - @Harpers

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The Conversation: Old wine in new bottles – why the NZ-UK free trade agreement fails to confront the challenges of a post-COVID world
When the sales pitch for a free trade agreement is that “British consumers will enjoy more affordable Marlborough sauvignon blanc, mānuka honey and kiwifruit, while Kiwis enjoy the benefit from cheaper gin, chocolate, clothing and buses”, you know this is hardly the deal of the century... More>>


Philip Temple: Hang On A Minute, Mate
Peter Dunne quietly omits some salient facts when arguing for retention of MMP’s coat-tailing provision that allows a party to add list seats if it wins one electorate and achieves more than 1% or so of the party vote... More>>


Cheap Grace And Climate Change: Australia And COP26

It was not for everybody, but the shock advertising tactics of the Australian comedian Dan Ilic made an appropriate point. Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison, a famed coal hugger, has vacillated about whether to even go to the climate conference in Glasgow. Having himself turned the country’s prime ministerial office into an extended advertising agency, Ilic was speaking his language... More>>



Dunne Speaks: Labour's High Water Mark
If I were still a member of the Labour Party I would be feeling a little concerned after this week’s Colmar Brunton public opinion poll. Not because the poll suggested Labour is going to lose office any time soon – it did not – nor because it showed other parties doing better – they are not... More>>



Our Man In Washington: Morrison’s Tour Of Deception

It was startling and even shocking. Away from the thrust and cut of domestic politics, not to mention noisy discord within his government’s ranks, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison could breathe a sign of relief. Perhaps no one would notice in Washington that Australia remains prehistoric in approaching climate change relative to its counterparts... More>>



Binoy Kampmark: Melbourne Quake: Shaken, Not Stirred

It began just after a news interview. Time: a quarter past nine. Morning of September 22, and yet to take a sip from the brewed Turkish coffee, its light thin surface foam inviting. The Australian city of Melbourne in its sixth lockdown, its residents fatigued and ravaged by regulations. Rising COVID-19 numbers, seemingly inexorable... More>>