Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Review: HP Elite Thunderbolt 3 Dock

Laptop docks or docking stations were all the rage a decade or so ago. While they come in different shapes and sizes, most add standard desktop PC features to laptops.

Above all, docks add ports so you can connect large displays, network hardware, extra storage and so on while charging your computer.

As the name suggests docks connect your laptop to the hardware. In the past they would include cradles, you would literally dock your laptop into the desktop section.

Thunderbolt and USB-C


Today most docks use less elaborate connectors. The NZ$345 plus GST HP Elite Thunderbolt 3 Dock connects to, say, the HP Elitebook Folio G1 via one of the computer’s two USB-C ports at one end and a combined Thunderbolt and power cable at the other.

The best docks are built for a fast connection, so you don’t need to fiddle with lots of awkward cables when you are in a hurry. In the case of the Elite Thunderbolt 3, that means unplugging a single connector.

HP Elite Thunderbolt 3 Dock HP Elite Thunderbolt 3 Dock

Versatile


Although HP sells the Elite Thunderbolt 3 Dock with its own computers, the dock may work with other computer maker’s hardware if they support Thunderbolt 3.

HP sent the dock for review with the Elitebook Folio G1, but it would be just at home with an HP Spectre.

As you can see from the photo the dock is an elegant two-tone grey oblong measuring 229 by 57 mm. It is 18 mm deep. That means it is small enough to sit under a monitor or in a draw when not in use.

A textured rubber base stops the dock from sliding across your desk. The front has a power button which lights when the dock is working. There are two USB 3.0 ports and an audio jack.

On the back you’ll find the combined Thunderbolt - power sockets. There’s also a gigabit Ethernet port, a VGA port and a cable lock socket so you can secure the dock. There are two USB 3.0 ports and two DisplayPort along with a USB Type-C port that supports Thunderbolt.

Brick


Instead of including the transformer in the dock, HP uses a separate power brick which has its own power cable.

The cables are long enough to reach a power point a couple of metres away. HP has also included a long enough lead for the brick to stay on the floor, there’s no need for it to sit next to the dock on your desk.

If you use the dock at a single desk, this arrangement is fine. If you hot desk, or move often between desks and have to move everything with you, it could be cumbersome to carry a laptop, dock, brick and power cable. There’s also more to forget.

Light


The good news is the entire ensemble only weighs 650g. The bad news is you going to need more of a laptop bag or briefcase if you need to carry everything around town or even between cities.

HP has left off some of the possible options, there’s no HDMI or DVI. If you need these, you’ll have to find an adaptor.

According to HP the Elite Thunderbolt 3 Dock can support two 4K monitors. We’ve only got one, so tested that working in tandem with the laptop’s built-in UHD display. There were no performance issues to report although the dock gets warm after a while.

Thanks to the arrival of minimalist ultraportable laptops like the HP models, Microsoft Surface Pro and MacBooks desktop docks look set for a comeback.

While Wi-fi and Bluetooth can carry a lot of the connectivity load, cables are still needed for high-definition video. Today’s lighted laptops have the bare minimum number of ports, that’s fine for some users, but many prefer more physical network or storage connections.

HP’s Elite Thunderbolt 3 Dock is an elegant and straightforward way of delivering the extra ports. It looks good and doesn’t get in the way.

Review: HP Elite Thunderbolt 3 Dock was first posted at billbennett.co.nz.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Ian Powell: Rescuing Simpson From Simpson

(Originally published at The Democracy Project ) Will the health reforms proposed for the Labour Government make the system better or worse? Health commentator Ian Powell (formerly the Executive Director of the Association of Salaried Medical ... More>>

Missions To Mars: Mapping, Probing And Plundering The Red Planet

In the first month of 2020, Forbes was all excitement about fresh opportunities for plunder and conquest. Titled “2020: The Year We Will Conquer Mars”, the contribution by astrophysicist Paul M. Sutter was less interested in the physics than the conquest. ... More>>

Richard S. Ehrlich: Coup Leader Grabs Absolute Power At Dawn

BANGKOK, Thailand -- By seizing power, Myanmar's new coup leader Commander-in-Chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing has protected his murky financial investments and the military's domination, but some of his incoming international ... More>>

Jennifer S. Hunt: Trump Evades Conviction Again As Republicans Opt For Self-Preservation

By Jennifer S. Hunt Lecturer in Security Studies, Australian National University Twice-impeached former US President Donald Trump has evaded conviction once more. On the fourth day of the impeachment trial, the Senate verdict is in . Voting guilty: ... More>>

Binoy Kampmark: Let The Investigation Begin: The International Criminal Court, Israel And The Palestinian Territories

International tribunals tend to be praised, in principle, by those they avoid investigating. Once interest shifts to those parties, such bodies become the subject of accusations: bias, politicisation, crude arbitrariness. The United States, whose legal and political ... More>>

The Conversation: How To Cut Emissions From Transport: Ban Fossil Fuel Cars, Electrify Transport And Get People Walking And Cycling

By Robert McLachlan Professor in Applied Mathematics, Massey University The Climate Change Commission’s draft advice on how to decarbonise New Zealand’s economy is refreshing, particularly as it calls on the government to start phasing out fossil ... More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog