Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

PM "utterly disagrees" with Trump attack on US congresswomen

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern condemns Donald Trump's attack on US congresswomen

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has condemned comments made by the US President attacking four Democratic congresswomen and says she utterly disagrees with him.

US President Donald Trump has been accused of racism after posting tweets attacking Democratic congresswomen.

He claimed the women "originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe", before suggesting they "go back".

He then said Speaker "Nancy Pelosi would be very happy to quickly work out free travel arrangements".

He's since doubled down on the attack accusing them of "hating our country".

Ms Ardern told Morning Report there's no place for comments like that and she is proud that the opposite exists in New Zealand.

"Usually I don't get into other people's politics, but it will be clear to most people that I completely and utterly disagree with him.

"I'm quite proud that in New Zealand we take the opposite view, that we take the view that our Parliament should be a representative place, it should look and feel like New Zealand, it should have a range of different cultures and ethnicities and never should a judgement be made about the origin of anyone, and their right therefore to be in Parliament as a representative.

"We should celebrate our diversity, we do in New Zealand, I'm proud of that and so I obviously take a very different view to President Trump."

"Never should a judgement be made about the origin of anyone" - Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern duration 5:09
from Morning Report

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

Foreign Minister Winston Peters is visiting the United States where he will speak at a conference on religious freedom, which Ms Ardern said would be a platform to speak openly about the fact that New Zealand wants to see a world which celebrates the diversity of its citizens and migrants.

Ms Ardern said she would expect Mr Peters to reiterate these views at the US conference, although she said it was not a bilateral meeting.

British Prime Minister Theresa May and her Canadian counterpart Justin Trudeau have also condemned Mr Trump's comments.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Fatuous Defence: Australia’s Guided Missile Plans

Even in times of pandemic crises, some things never change. While Australia gurgles and bumbles slowly with its COVID-19 vaccine rollout, there are other priorities at stake. Threat inflators are receiving much interest in defence, and the media ... More>>

Richard S. Ehrlich: Cambodia's Hun Sen Feels Politically Vaccinated

BANGKOK, Thailand -- When Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen received his AstraZeneca vaccination shot, he suddenly felt invulnerable and vowed to rule indefinitely. Hun Sen is already one of the world's longest ruling prime ministers, confident his successor ... More>>

Reese Erlich: Foreign Correspondent: My Final Column?

I’m dying. It’s not easy to write these words. But it’s true. More>>

Binoy Kampmark: Brawling Over Vaccines: Export Bans And The EU’s Bungled Rollout
The European Union has been keeping up appearances in encouraging the equitable distribution of vaccines to combat SARS-CoV-2 and its disease, COVID-19. Numerous statements speak to the need to back the COVAX scheme, to ensure equity and that no one state misses out... More>>

Jennifer S. Hunt: Trump Evades Conviction Again As Republicans Opt For Self-Preservation

By Jennifer S. Hunt Lecturer in Security Studies, Australian National University Twice-impeached former US President Donald Trump has evaded conviction once more. On the fourth day of the impeachment trial, the Senate verdict is in . Voting guilty: ... More>>

Binoy Kampmark: Let The Investigation Begin: The International Criminal Court, Israel And The Palestinian Territories

International tribunals tend to be praised, in principle, by those they avoid investigating. Once interest shifts to those parties, such bodies become the subject of accusations: bias, politicisation, crude arbitrariness. The United States, whose legal and political ... More>>