Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Regions to get share of $190m infrastructure funding

Eight regions around the country from Northland to Southland will get a share of a $190 million injection for infrastructure projects.

Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announcing $190m of infrastructure funding. Photo: RNZ / Jordan Bond

The funding is part of of the $12 billion New Zealand Upgrade Programme.

Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones said the projects, across land, air and sea would grow the regions, modernise infrastructure and prepare for climate change.

The flagship project, redeveloping Ōpōtiki Harbour, will receive $79.4m.

Jones said it would revitalise the township and create almost 2000 jobs, including 730 in the town, many in aquaculture.

"Direct employment in Ōpōtiki longer term will be driven by work on sea farm servicing vessels, production staff in processing facilities and support staff in the aquaculture industry.

"Ōpōtiki Harbour has been in the pipeline for such a long time with successive governments unable to make the project stack up. With the full attention of officials from the Provincial Development Unit... we have been able to develop a concept that is fit-for-purpose yet affordable.

"Given Ōpōtiki has one of the country's highest levels of social and economic deprivation, with low household incomes, high unemployment and below average educational outcomes, new employment in town will make a big impact on wellbeing and social participation."

The total cost of the project is $99.4m, with the Bay of Plenty Regional contributing $20m. The projects are across Northland, Bay of Plenty, Hawke's Bay, Taranaki, Otago, West Coast, Canterbury and Southland. None of the country's largest cities are included.

Almost $90m has been allocated for 14 roading and safety improvements, including improving or building intersections, roundabouts, bridges, seawalls, and flood mitigation.

"This funding boost has allowed us to get projects underway that may not have been an exact fit with the Provincial Growth Fund criteria but were worthy investments nonetheless," the minister said.

"These projects will now be able to be included in our infrastructure pipeline, bringing more certainty and planning ability to the broader infrastructure sector."

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Ian Powell: Rescuing Simpson From Simpson

(Originally published at The Democracy Project ) Will the health reforms proposed for the Labour Government make the system better or worse? Health commentator Ian Powell (formerly the Executive Director of the Association of Salaried Medical ... More>>

Missions To Mars: Mapping, Probing And Plundering The Red Planet

In the first month of 2020, Forbes was all excitement about fresh opportunities for plunder and conquest. Titled “2020: The Year We Will Conquer Mars”, the contribution by astrophysicist Paul M. Sutter was less interested in the physics than the conquest. ... More>>

Richard S. Ehrlich: Coup Leader Grabs Absolute Power At Dawn

BANGKOK, Thailand -- By seizing power, Myanmar's new coup leader Commander-in-Chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing has protected his murky financial investments and the military's domination, but some of his incoming international ... More>>

Jennifer S. Hunt: Trump Evades Conviction Again As Republicans Opt For Self-Preservation

By Jennifer S. Hunt Lecturer in Security Studies, Australian National University Twice-impeached former US President Donald Trump has evaded conviction once more. On the fourth day of the impeachment trial, the Senate verdict is in . Voting guilty: ... More>>

Binoy Kampmark: Let The Investigation Begin: The International Criminal Court, Israel And The Palestinian Territories

International tribunals tend to be praised, in principle, by those they avoid investigating. Once interest shifts to those parties, such bodies become the subject of accusations: bias, politicisation, crude arbitrariness. The United States, whose legal and political ... More>>

The Conversation: How To Cut Emissions From Transport: Ban Fossil Fuel Cars, Electrify Transport And Get People Walking And Cycling

By Robert McLachlan Professor in Applied Mathematics, Massey University The Climate Change Commission’s draft advice on how to decarbonise New Zealand’s economy is refreshing, particularly as it calls on the government to start phasing out fossil ... More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog