Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Liquor Debate: Youth ID Voting Commences

The liquor debate began this morning with Issue 2 whether or not there should by an Photo ID card for young people - arguably the critical provision in the bill as if photo ID is approved then considerable support will come in to support lowering the drinking age. Voting has now commenced and looks to be painfully slow.

Shortly after midday a personal vote division was called for on option A - the least restrictive and which does not provide for a youth ID.

However the real debate appears to be over Option D which a large number of speakers appeared to support.

Option D will only come up once Options A, B and C have been defeated. If they are defeated. There are numerous amendments. (See earlier stories for background on how the debate is being conducted.)

Under Consideration:

Issue Two - Evidence Of Age Document

Option A - The status quo. No evidence of age document, policing of age the responsibility of liquor outlet managers with the defence of reasonable grounds for believing someone to be of the correct age.
Option B - Provides for an evidence of age document (anything with a photograph or as prescribed by the Minister) to be a defence against selling alcohol to a minor. Also the current defence would also stand.
Option C - Provides for an evidence of age document (anything with a photograph or as prescribed by the Minister) to be a defence against selling alcohol to a minor.
Option D - Provides for an evidence of age document (anything with a photograph or as prescribed by the Minister) and also allows the Minister of Justice to authorise a photo ID card.


(Debate Snippets. The following is far from comprehensive and just catches a smidgen of a debate rich with evocation of youth.)

Prefacing the debate Jonathan Hunt expressed disappointment with the arrangements for dealing with the bill - the two bites of the cherry approach - and the select committee's failure to come up with recommendations.

Tony Ryall then rose to defend and explain the system and its reasons followed by Phil Goff who - uncharacteristically - expressed his clear support for Ryall's arguments.

As debate began several speakers observed the need for the result of today and tomorrow's proceedings to be a consistent clear approach to liquor reform.

Towards the end a consensus appeared to have emerged. Police should have more resources or not. The ID should have a digitised photo or not.

OPTION D: Lianne Dalziel - Labour: Proof of age should be the only defence and will move an amendment to that effect in phase 2 - agree with option D. Young people say they want to have a means for demonstrating their age and I don't want to see the drivers license (associated with driving) also associated with drinking.

OPTION D: George Hawkins - Labour: Agreed with Dalziel. It is what young people believe that is important. I talked to two high-schools. And some very astute students. 62% of them believed their should be photographic ID and 28% said none. I first went to a pub when I was 20. People say the police should be tougher - but they also say that more burglars should be caught.

OPTION D: Steve Maharey - Labour: For the City of Palmerston North. We have a clear position on alcohol use in Palmerston North as a student and army city. We have come to a simple conclusion. We want the age to be 18 and we want clear identification to be in place. We will be seeking 18 as the age and option D. The police find it extremely difficult to police at present. We are a student city and we want to be able to act responsibly, effectively and efficiently. On August 26th want to join the liquor debate with an amendment on a host responsibility regime. We want to change the age so that young people will be safer. But we also want to say to hosts - yes young people are in there - but you must serve alcohol responsibly and prevent abuse.

OPTION D: Member for Manakau East (Ross Robertson?) - This electorate is the face of the future. I surveyed my electorate. The electorate felt so strongly about it they voted 9 to 1 for a compulsory ID card recognising that 18 might become the law.

OPTION D: Warren Kyd - National - I congratulate the select committee. I think this is the important section. I tend to be fairly conservative about identification and liberal about other issues. I am a reformed smoker. I am going to support option D. In my view this is not particularly onerous. What it does do is provide protection to licensees and their staff. One sees abuse of club cards. One sees swapping cards. That's why I support option D.

(OPTION D - probably): Grant Gillon - Alliance - I want an assurance that if there is an ID that the photo will not be digitalised and will not have a signature. 18 year olds can now drink already in the company of their elders. My experience has showed me that there has been a change in the drinking attitudes of youngsters. They tend to be more disciplined now. My children for example club together and get a taxi home. This is a recent phenomena. I would like to see 18-19 year olds to be able to drink in safety not with a crate on the beach or in the park. In my previous job as a firefighter I saw limbs torn apart in motor accidents. The critical question is how will it be monitored.

OPTION D: Jill Pettis - Labour: Very important we have nationwide consistency. Let us accept that any card is not adequate. If this is going to be an enforcement mechanism it needs integrity to be used. I too have problems with the order of voting - but I respect what the Minister and Select Committee say about that.

OPPOSED TO OPTION D: (Robyn MacDonald?)- Opposed to the digitised photograph in the Drivers license. When you are talking about a small sector of the community. This is just ridiculous. You have to first ask what sort of ID they want and at what cost. We have not had sufficient consultation on this.

National - Shane Arden - move closure.

OPTION A: Frank Grover - Christian Heritage. When considering drivers licenses I had same concerns. Major problem is this. Bringing in any option other than A will provide an easy cop-out. Currently it is perfectly appropriate for proof of age. If they are produced ID then they can sell it. Providing a complete defence will compound the current problem. Let us make the responsibility stay on.

National - Pansy Wong - move closure.

Committee chair allows Grant Gillon to seek leave to speak to an amendment - refused.

Point Of Order - Member sought leave to amend SOP.

Question Put on Option A:

Wayne Mapp - Amendment

Ryall - "Mr Mapp is attaching tougher penalties to every option and will have to move an amendment to every option. We have discussed this in the business committee."

Vote for Option A As Amended.

LOUDLY: Defeated…..
Personal vote called for…..

Vote ends - 10 minutes later…Future Bells will only be one minute.

Speaker Option A as amended is not agreed to.

Point of Order: Phillida Bunkle missed the vote - "you simply cannot get here in seven minutes from the upper floors of Bowen House."

Later it emerged that Ken Shirley. Another member of Act. Jeanette Fitzsimmons and Phillida Bunkle all arrived late and then that Phillida had in fact voted by proxy.


(continues...)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Eric Zuesse: U.S. Empire: Biden And Kerry Gave Orders To Ukraine’s President

Eric Zuesse, originally posted at Strategic Culture On May 19th, an implicit international political warning was issued, but it wasn’t issued between countries; it was issued between allied versus opposed factions within each of two countries: U.S. and Ukraine. ... More>>

Binoy Kampmark: Budget Cockups In The Time Of Coronavirus: Reporting Errors And Australia’s JobKeeper Scheme

Hell has, in its raging fires, ringside seats for those who like their spreadsheets. The seating, already peopled by those from human resources, white collar criminals and accountants, becomes toastier for those who make errors with those spreadsheets. ... More>>


The Dig - COVID-19: Just Recovery

The COVID-19 crisis is compelling us to kick-start investment in a regenerative and zero-carbon future. We were bold enough to act quickly to stop the virus - can we now chart a course for a just recovery? More>>

The Conversation: Are New Zealand's New COVID-19 Laws And Powers Really A Step Towards A Police State?

Reaction to the New Zealand government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and resultant lockdown has ranged from high praise to criticism that its actions were illegal and its management chaotic. More>>


Keith Rankin: Universal Versus Targeted Assistance, A Muddled Dichotomy

The Commentariat There is a regular commentariat who appear on places such as 'The Panel' on Radio New Zealand (4pm on weekdays), and on panels on television shows such as Newshub Nation (TV3, weekends) and Q+A (TV1, Mondays). Generally, these panellists ... More>>


Binoy Kampmark: Welcome Deaths: Coronavirus And The Open Plan Office

For anybody familiar with that gruesome manifestation of the modern work place, namely the open plan office, the advent of coronavirus might be something of a relief. The prospects for infection in such spaces is simply too great. You are at risk from ... More>>

Caitlin Johnstone: Do You Consent To The New Cold War?

The world's worst Putin puppet is escalating tensions with Russia even further, with the Trump administration looking at withdrawal from more nuclear treaties in the near future. In addition to planning on withdrawing from the Open Skies Treaty ... More>>


Binoy Kampmark: Why Thinking Makes It So: Donald Trump’s Obamagate Fixation

The “gate” suffix has been wearing thin since the break-in scandal that gave it its birth. Since Watergate, virtually anything dubious and suggestive, and much more besides, is suffixed. Which brings us to the issue of President Donald Trump’s ... More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Ethics (and Some Of The Economics) Of Lifting The Lockdown

As New Zealand passes the half-way mark towards moving out of Level Four lockdown, the trade-offs involved in life-after-lockdown are starting to come into view. All very well for National’s finance spokesperson Paul Goldsmith to claim that “The number one priority we have is to get out of the lockdown as soon as we can”…Yet as PM Jacinda Ardern pointed out a few days ago, any crude trade-off between public health and economic well-being would be a false choice... More>>


Binoy Kampmark: Brutal Choices: Anders Tegnell And Sweden’s Herd Immunity Goal

If the title of epidemiological czar were to be created, its first occupant would have to be Sweden’s Anders Tegnell. He has held sway in the face of sceptics and concern that his “herd immunity” approach to COVID-19 is a dangerous, and breathtakingly ... More>>


 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog