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Questions Of The Day (1-6)

Questions For Oral Answer Tuesday, 7 September 1999

The following are paraphrases of today's questions for oral answer. They are not complete or official, the official record of Parliamentary proceedings is Hansard, which is not finalised some days after the event.

Question 1.

Dr Wayne Mapp to the Minister of Conservation Nick Smith:

Q: Will the proposed Hauraki Gulf Marine Park be finalised in time for New Zealand's hosting of the America's Cup?

A: It is my hope the park can be established prior to the start of the America's Cup Challenger Series. I urge Labour to reconsider its decision on this matter.

There are about five questions there I seek leave to answer them all.

(Speaker: No need to ask - the answer is in Minister's hands.)

1. Why so long?

Anyone would appreciate that to get 13 councils to agree on the plan is a Houdini act.

2. Why not all land at Tamaki in proposed park?

It is not the government's intention to transfer all the land to DOC. We want to discuss talking about giving the land to the people of Auckland? Mr Smith offered to work with the opposition to get a resolution to the impasse.

Question 2.

Rt Hon. Helen Clark to the Prime Minister Jenny Shipley:

Q: Will she, as chair of the APEC Leaders' Meeting, ensure that resolution of the crisis in East Timor is placed on the formal agenda of the meeting; if not, why not?

A: (Transferred to end of question time to allow PM to answer in person.)

Question 3.

Hon. Richard Prebble to the Minister for Enterprise and Commerce Max Bradford:

Q: Has the Government received any requests for the Employment Contracts Act 1991 to be scrapped in favour of a system that gives trade unions monopoly rights; if so, has the Government any plans to adopt such a policy?

A: No and certainly not. The adoption of such a policy would be a major blow to the freedom of choice. This backdoor attempt by Labour at compulsory unionism would give unions - which represent less than 20% of the workforce - unreasonable levels of influence.

(Richard Prebble sought leave to table what he said was Labour's policy - granted.)

(Trevor Mallard sought leave to table a document showing Richard Prebble voting for compulsory unionism - refused.)

Question 4.

Ron Mark to the Minister of Corrections Clem Simich:

Q: What security consultants were recently involved in the awarding of contracts with respect to Mount Eden Prison perimeter control and other prisons, and who were the successful tenderers?

A: The corrections department has contracted out security advice over the past three years. Mostly to two consultancy firms - named two firms.

Q: Can he confirm a conflict of interest between a consultant (named) and US Company Honeywell. He said the consultant had been on an all expenses paid tour to the US recently at Honeywell's expense.

A: Matters of that detail do not come to me. I will be happy to provide further information to a written question

Question 5.

Hon. Phil Goff to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Don McKinnon:

Q: What are the details of any action he has taken to promote multilateral action, such as financial, trade, military, and political sanctions against Indonesia, in order to force Indonesia to stop the slaughter of people in East Timor; if he has taken no action, why not?

A: (Deferred till end of question time.)

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