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The Dominion

Thousands quit costly Transalta - Wrangling snags work bill passage - Kissing teacher cleared of rape - Showing solidarity - Three survive Stigley meeting - Genetic screening code investigated - MPs may get rise of more than 3 per cent - Inside Headlines - Sports lead - Editorial

Thousands quit costly Transalta: Transalta has lost several thousand customers, including about 2000 in Wellington, after announcing last month it was increasing daily fixed line charges.

Wrangling snags work bill passage: An embarrassing spat between the Government and the Greens threw the passage of new employment laws into disarray last night.

Kissing teacher cleared of rape: A Taranaki teacher who admitted kissing a pupil who had a crush on him is still employed by the school.

Showing Solidarity: The front page pic. show the Onslow College 1st XV who shaved their heads in support of a teamate with leukaemia.

Three survive Stigley meeting: Key people in LGNZ were endorsed at an emergency meeting last night in the wake of the resignation of chief executive Carol Stigley.

Genetic screening code investigated: NZ's Insurance Council has started investigating how it might frame a code of practice for the genetic screening of people with health risks that show up in their gene carrying molecule DNA.

MPs may get more than a 3 percent pay rise: MPs could be in for a much bigger pay hike than the three per cent rise recommended by Reserve Bank governor Don Brash.

Inside Headlines:


- Clark gives as good as she gets at business conference;
- Aussies give Cullen the cold shoulder on citizenship;
- Kiwis earn more money away from home;
- Moore hopeful of trade liberalisation talks;
- ANZAC spirit 'flourishing' in Timor;
- Goff heads for Forum meeting;
- Samuels: I'm been made to walk plank;
- Killer didn't seem hostile -woman'
- Fire-fighter ready to tackle the Big One;
- Woman charged with assaulting child;
- Todd's critic admits cannabis use;
- Hospital workers get $1million award;
- Rock kills road workers in Alps.


Sportslead:

- Collins wary of the hype: Outstanding young Wellington loose-forward Jerry Collins is wary of hype and the predictions of future honours which so often fail to materialise for young stars who rise too fast, too soon.

Editorial: Lock away the dangerous.

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