Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

National Radio 8am Bulletin

Submarine Accident – Indian Bomb – Dover Samuels – Local Government NZ – ERB – Joanne McCarthy – Kura Kaupapa – Whooping Cough – Calve Thefts - Quake

SUBMARINE ACCIDENT: The Pentagon says there is no indication any of its submarines were involved in a collision with a Russian Submarine that is lying on the bottom of the sea east of Norway. The Russsian’s say there are no nuclear weapons on board the submarine and the reactor has been shut down.

INDIAN BOMB: A bomb has ripped through the last carriage of a train in India. Heavy security is in place for Independence Day celebrations today.

DOVER SAMUELS: The National Party leader Jenny Shipley is expected to release today the evidence on which she based dirt digging allegations against the PM Helen Clark. Helen Clark has denied digging dirt.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT NZ: The Mayor of Palmerston North Jill White says that Local Government NZ must use regional meetings to restore confidence in the organisation.

ERB: The marathon debate on the ERB will resume under urgency this afternoon. The house began debating the 11th and final part of the bill last night but there are still schedules to go. The Leader of the House says that at the end of the day the Government will win.

JOANNE MCCARTHY: The jury in the Joanne McCarthy murder case will resume deliberations today. The jury retired at 9.30pm last night.

KURA KAUPAPA: One in five Maori immersion schools are considered a risk to their students education, double the ratio in schools as a whole.

WHOOPING COUGH: Medical authorities are welcoming the arrival of a new improved version of the whooping cough vaccine.

CALVE THEFTS: Waikato Farmers are having to mount guard over the calves because of the high prices they are receiving. Calves are worth $100 to $120 each.

QUAKE: An earthquake was felt in the lower North Island just after 2am. It was centered 10km east if Waikanae and measured 4.6 on the Richter scale.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

The Conversation: Old wine in new bottles – why the NZ-UK free trade agreement fails to confront the challenges of a post-COVID world
When the sales pitch for a free trade agreement is that “British consumers will enjoy more affordable Marlborough sauvignon blanc, mānuka honey and kiwifruit, while Kiwis enjoy the benefit from cheaper gin, chocolate, clothing and buses”, you know this is hardly the deal of the century... More>>


Philip Temple: Hang On A Minute, Mate
Peter Dunne quietly omits some salient facts when arguing for retention of MMP’s coat-tailing provision that allows a party to add list seats if it wins one electorate and achieves more than 1% or so of the party vote... More>>


Cheap Grace And Climate Change: Australia And COP26

It was not for everybody, but the shock advertising tactics of the Australian comedian Dan Ilic made an appropriate point. Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison, a famed coal hugger, has vacillated about whether to even go to the climate conference in Glasgow. Having himself turned the country’s prime ministerial office into an extended advertising agency, Ilic was speaking his language... More>>



Dunne Speaks: Labour's High Water Mark
If I were still a member of the Labour Party I would be feeling a little concerned after this week’s Colmar Brunton public opinion poll. Not because the poll suggested Labour is going to lose office any time soon – it did not – nor because it showed other parties doing better – they are not... More>>



Our Man In Washington: Morrison’s Tour Of Deception

It was startling and even shocking. Away from the thrust and cut of domestic politics, not to mention noisy discord within his government’s ranks, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison could breathe a sign of relief. Perhaps no one would notice in Washington that Australia remains prehistoric in approaching climate change relative to its counterparts... More>>



Binoy Kampmark: Melbourne Quake: Shaken, Not Stirred

It began just after a news interview. Time: a quarter past nine. Morning of September 22, and yet to take a sip from the brewed Turkish coffee, its light thin surface foam inviting. The Australian city of Melbourne in its sixth lockdown, its residents fatigued and ravaged by regulations. Rising COVID-19 numbers, seemingly inexorable... More>>