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Nation Radio Midday Report

Concorde Compensation Claim – Speight Trial - Russian Sub – Hospital Survey – Health Appointments – Petrol Prices – Child Abuse Sentence – Youth Mental Health Debate – Poinion Polls – National Conference - Mataura Closure – Tainui Injunction – Speight Trial – Backpacker’s Arson Trial

- RUSSIAN SUB: Russia has vowed to keep up rescue effort to save any crew still alive in the crippled submarine in the Barents Sea, despite evidence some or all of the crew may be dead. It is now believed a collision was behind the disaster, with underwater video showing severe damage to the bow of the Kursk.

- HOSPITAL SURVEY: A survey of some of the larger hospitals has showed fewer junior doctor vacancies than expected, but hundreds of nursing vacancies. Some doctors groups are saying young doctors need to be given relief from student loan debt to stem the tide of young doctors moving overseas, but the results of the survey suggest any action should include nurses as well.

- HEALTH APPOINTMENTS: The people appointed to initially run local health services under the Government’s restructuring have begun to be notified of their new roles.

- PETROL PRICES: People are turning to public transport because of skyrocketing petrol costs. Cleaner air may be a positive by-product of inflated petrol costs.

- CHILD ABUSE SENTENCE: The mother of 6 year old girl who died of brain damage after years of beating was sentenced to 5 years jail for manslaughter. The girl was subjected to serious and sustained abuse.

- YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH DEBATE: Debate is raging over who pays for youth mental health services after the Commissioner for Children, Roger McLay, has footed the bill for a suicidal 14-year-old, after the mother of the boy was turned down for help by every Government agency she went to.

- OPINION POLLS: Parliament is considering whether it should ban opinion polls in the 28 days leading up to general elections. NZ First MP Winston Peters has support from Labour, National and Alliance for his private members bill. Green co-leader Rod Donald opposes the bill, saying they are crucial for smaller parties. NZ First says polls can skew the results of an election.

- NATIONAL CONFERENCE: National says it intends putting in place the building blocks for a victory in the next general election in 2002 during its three day annual conference beginning in Christchurch this afternoon. Leadership is not expected to be an issue during the gathering.

- MATAURA CLOSURE: The Mataura paper mill in Southland closes today after 124 year of paper making. Carter Holt Harvey announced the closure of the unprofitable mill last month, citing higher costs of raw materials and increased competition from overseas.

- TAINUI INJUNCTION: Injunction hearing in the High Court to decide who’s in control of the Waikato Tainui tribe has been adjourned to allow the opposing sides to negotiate a resolution.

- CONCORD COMPENSATION CLAIM: Lawyers representing 96 German holiday makers killed on the Concorde crash in Paris are negotiating with Air France for several hundred million dollars compensation.

- SPEIGHT TRIAL: Fiji’s chief majistrate has disqualified himself from hearing the case against George Speight 12 others. His decision follows concern over his family relationship with a Speight accompli.

-BACKPACKER’S ARSON TRIAL: A Man is due in court in Queensland on arson and murder charges following the following the backpacker’s hotel fire in Childers.


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