Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

National Radio Midday Report

Name Supression Lifted – Child Abuse Conference – Chopper Crash – Pilot Trial – Doctors’ Strike – Gisborne Hospital Inquiry – Air NZ – Waitangi Fisheries Commission – Super-Yacht Facility – Olympic Packages – Telecommunications Inquiry – Christchurch Homicide – Blazing Tower

- NAME SUPRESSION LIFTED: The Court of Appeal has ended name suppression for a billionaire American who admitted three charges of importing cannabis into New Zealand. His Name cannot be made public until 2:15 tomorrow.

- CHILD ABUSE CONFERENCE: Commissioner for Children Roger McClay will chair a conference on whether the reporting of child abuse should be mandatory for health professionals.

- CHOPPER CRASH: A helicopter has crashed near Wanganui. Only the pilot was on board, but no further details are available.

- PILOT TRIAL: Cross-examination has begun at the depositions hearing of the Ansett Dash-8 pilot who crashed near Palmerston North killing four people five years ago. The judge will decide if there is enough evidence to bring the man to trial on manslaughter charges.

- DOCTORS’ STRIKE: Junior doctors and Public Hospital representatives are meeting in Wellington to try to find a way through their pay dispute. A mediator has been brought in at the request of the hospitals.

- GISBORNE HOSPITAL INQUIRY: The Health and Disability Commissioner has finished interviewing nursing staff employed by Tairawhiti Healthcare as part of its investigation into Gisborne Hospital. The investigation was sparked by reports an anesthetist had reused disposable syringes. The hospital also admitted more than 400 men may have had their prostate cancer tests misread.

- AIR NZ: Air NZ’s profit has been hit by high petrol prices and the poor performance of its associate Ansett Australia.

- WAITANGI FISHERIES COMMISSION: The first meeting of the new Waitangi Fisheries Commission is underway. Only four of the original 10 commissioners are still on the Commission. There are seven new commissioners, including representatives of Urban Maori.

- SUPER-YACHT FACILITY: Training agencies in Whangarei are gearing up for the demands for workers in the city’s new super-yacht industry. More than $80m will be injected into Northland’s economy, with 120 new jobs before Christmas and up to 1000 new jobs in five years time.

- OLYMPIC TRAVEL PACKAGES: A travel agency selling package deals to the Sydney Olympics says New Zealand has missed out on big sales because travel agent’s initial prices were too high.

- TELECOMMUNICATIONS INQUIRY: Telecom has told the ministerial inquiry into telecommunication that it doesn’t believe Internet and data calls are covered by the Kiwi Share agreement with the Government.

- CHRISTCHURCH HOMICIDE: Police begun homicide investigations following the forensic examination of a dead man discovered in Christchurch.

- BLAZING TOWER: Moscow firefighters have put out the fire in its television skyscraper. The tower is now listing visibly. Television broadcasts have been knocked out, with the exception of a private channel, which has been openly critical of the Russian Government. Russian President Vladimir Putin has conceded the blaze, along with the Kursk disaster, underlines Russia’s desperate plight. He said the country is in a shambles, and only economic recovery can put Russia back on track.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 


Philip Temple: Hang On A Minute, Mate
Peter Dunne quietly omits some salient facts when arguing for retention of MMP’s coat-tailing provision that allows a party to add list seats if it wins one electorate and achieves more than 1% or so of the party vote... More>>


Cheap Grace And Climate Change: Australia And COP26

It was not for everybody, but the shock advertising tactics of the Australian comedian Dan Ilic made an appropriate point. Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison, a famed coal hugger, has vacillated about whether to even go to the climate conference in Glasgow. Having himself turned the country’s prime ministerial office into an extended advertising agency, Ilic was speaking his language... More>>


Binoy Kampmark: Funeral Rites For COVID Zero
It was such a noble public health dream, even if rather hazy to begin with. Run down SARS-CoV-2. Suppress it. Crush it. Or just “flatten the curve”, which could have meant versions of all the above. This created a climate of numerical sensitivity: a few case infections here, a few cases there, would warrant immediate, sharp lockdowns, stay-at-home orders, the closure of all non-vital service outlets... More>>


Dunne Speaks: Labour's High Water Mark
If I were still a member of the Labour Party I would be feeling a little concerned after this week’s Colmar Brunton public opinion poll. Not because the poll suggested Labour is going to lose office any time soon – it did not – nor because it showed other parties doing better – they are not... More>>



Our Man In Washington: Morrison’s Tour Of Deception

It was startling and even shocking. Away from the thrust and cut of domestic politics, not to mention noisy discord within his government’s ranks, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison could breathe a sign of relief. Perhaps no one would notice in Washington that Australia remains prehistoric in approaching climate change relative to its counterparts... More>>



Binoy Kampmark: Melbourne Quake: Shaken, Not Stirred

It began just after a news interview. Time: a quarter past nine. Morning of September 22, and yet to take a sip from the brewed Turkish coffee, its light thin surface foam inviting. The Australian city of Melbourne in its sixth lockdown, its residents fatigued and ravaged by regulations. Rising COVID-19 numbers, seemingly inexorable... More>>