Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

TV3 News

Telecoms Changes – Telecoms Reaction – Plane Crash – Phillida Bunkle – Women’s Refuge – Nazi Thesis – Race Relations – Eruption – Super Jumbo

TELECOMS CHANGES: Telecom is to be forced to improve its performance but the market is happy with the outcome of the Telecommunications inquiry pushing Telecom’s share price up. Minister Paul Swain says the inquiry wasn’t an anti-Telecom inquiry. Alliance Minister Laila Harre is pleased the government is finally acting. The Government is also going to renegotiate the kiwi share as part of a package of measures. The costs of the regime for Telecom are expected to be around $100 million. Laila Harre says the changes will lead to cheaper phone bills. Ministers sold today’s announcement as world leading which looks to be a big ask.

TELECOMS REACTION: Telecom CEO Theresa Gattung says she is happy to work within the proposed regime. Telecom Users say that consumers will benefit from the changes. A fight looks likely to continue however into local line unbundling says Clear. Telecom has agreed to upgrade its rural network. National has greeted the changes as basically positive but says too many services will be regulated.

PLANE CRASH: Investigations are underway into a light plane crash in Canterbury that killed three. The four seater aircraft crashed in a valley south of Hamner Springs. The crash was found by a farmer. Names of the victims are yet to be released. This is the second crash in the last week.

PHILLIDA BUNKLE: Alliance Minister Phillida Bunkle is giving up her taxpayer funded apartment on Oriental Parade. Many people have said she is not entitled to the apartment as a Wellington based minister. Bunkle says she is not Wellington based although she stood in Wellington Central in the last election. Bunkle says everything she has done has been approved. Nineteen other ministers live in taxpayer funded homes in the capital.

WOMEN’S REFUGE: Women’s refuge is getting a funding boost as part of a more than $2 million boost to funding to fight family violence.

NAZI THESIS: A student who concluded the Nazi’s didn’t use gas chambers to kill Jews in Germany has had his thesis publicly criticised by the University of Canterbury. The Canterbury student, now Dr Joel Hayward, wrote the thesis in 1993 earning himself first class honours for his MA. He has since admitted the thesis was flawed, however the thesis cannot be legally withdrawn after the event. Dr Hayward has dropped his interest in WWII in favour of Napoleon. The University has apologised publicly and says the thesis did not deserve its high mark.

RACE RELATIONS: The Race Relations Conciliator says that complaints to his office have jumped over the last year.

ERUPTION: An eruption near Mexico City has thousands of villagers on the move as large rocks are thrown more than 10 kilometers from the volcano.

SUPER JUMBO: A passenger plane far bigger than the Jumbo is to be built in Europe. Airbus has launched the A380, which has capacity for over 500 passengers in its two deck configuration. There is lots more room in these planes for facilities like playrooms and shops. The first of the Super Jumbos is due to take off early 2006.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 


Julian Assange: A Thousand Days In Belmarsh
Julian Assange has now been in the maximum-security facilities of Belmarsh prison for over 1,000 days. On the occasion of his 1,000th day of imprisonment, campaigners, supporters and kindred spirits gathered to show their support, indignation and solidarity at this political detention most foul... More>>

Binoy Kampmark: The Mauling Of Novak Djokovic
Rarely can the treatment of a grand sporting figure by officialdom have caused such consternation. Novak Djokovic, the tennis World Number One, has always had a tendency to get under skin and constitution, creating a large following of admirers and detractors. But his current treatment by Australian authorities, and his subsequent detention as an unlawful arrival despite being granted a visa to participate in the Australian Open, had the hallmarks of oppression and incompetent vulgarity... More>>

Binoy Kampmark: Voices Of Concern: Aussies For Assange’s Return

With Julian Assange now fighting the next stage of efforts to extradite him to the United States to face 18 charges, 17 of which are based on the brutal, archaic Espionage Act, some Australian politicians have found their voice. It might be said that a few have even found their conscience... More>>



Forbidden Parties: Boris Johnson’s Law On Illegal Covid Gatherings

It was meant to be time to reflect. The eager arms of a new pandemic were enfolding a society with asphyxiating, lethal effect. Public health authorities advocated various measures: social distancing, limited contact between family and friends, limited mobility. No grand booze-ups. No large parties. No bonking, except within dispensations of intimacy and various “bubble” arrangements. Certainly, no orgies... More>>

Dunne Speaks: Question Time Is Anything But
The focus placed on the first couple of Question Time exchanges between the new leader of the National Party and the Prime Minister will have seemed excessive to many but the most seasoned Parliamentary observers. Most people, especially those outside the Wellington beltway, imagine Question Time is exactly what it sounds... More>>



Gasbagging In Glasgow: COP26 And Phasing Down Coal

Words can provide sharp traps, fettering language and caging definitions. They can also speak to freedom of action and permissiveness. At COP26, that permissiveness was all the more present in the haggling ahead of what would become the Glasgow Climate Pact... More>>