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The New York Times

YELTSIN - Russian President Boris Yeltsin tipped his hand, and Russia's political apple cart, by firing his prime minister on Monday and replacing him with a former K.G.B. officer and loyal aide whom he named as his candidate for president.

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN - Elizabeth Dole is no longer widely viewed by the Republican establishment as the obvious alternative should the front-runner, Gov. George W. Bush of Texas, collapse.

DAY-TRADING - Many day-trading firms use deceptive marketing practices to lure customers into a rapid-fire stock trading strategy that will probably cause them to lose money, a group of state securities regulators said Monday.

POLICE COMPLAINTS - Police Commissioner Howard Safir is considering a plan to change the way the Police Department disciplines officers to give the Civilian Complaint Review Board a greater role in investigating police misconduct.

SARAJEVO The marks of war are nearly erased from Sarajevo. Sheets of glass have been fitted into the high rises and the shell holes have been plastered over. But the Bosnian capital has lost its sense of purpose, its direction, and many say its soul.

THAI CORRUPTION - What started as private outrage has swelled into a very public challenge against Thailand's closed and corrupt bureaucracy, part of a struggle that has turned a society built on harmony and civility into one that is increasingly argumentative, litigious and noisy as it searches for democratic change.

MASS KILLERS - A 15-year-old boy charged in the shooting of six classmates on May 20 at a high school in Conyers, Ga., had left a letter under his bed expressing admiration for the two teen-agers who killed 12 students, a teacher and themselves at a high school in Littleton, Colo., exactly a month earlier, according to court testimony.

PAIN STUDY - Using diagnostic devices like PET -- or positron emission tomagraphy -- scanning and functional magnetic resonance imaging, or f.M.R.I., scientists have been able for the first time to peer deep into the brain and watch pain at work, "lighting up" specific neurons.

STARR - Kenneth Starr, the Whitewater independent counsel, said Monday that he planned to conclude his long-running investigation of President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton before the November 2000 elections by filing a final report.

ISRAEL - Secretary of State Madeleine Albright announced on Monday that at Israel's request, she had postponed a trip to the Middle East until at least the end of the month while the new Israeli government tries to persuade the Palestinians to accept changes in their latest land-for-security agreement.

http://www.nytimes.com

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