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TV1 6pm news

1. CONCERT CANCELLED - Gisborne's star studded concert has had the plug pulled. Hundreds of kiwis are out of pocket with 1000 of them forking out $400 each. The plug was pulled because of a lack of support. Split Enz are now negotiating to play in Auckland and they hope Bowie will be as well. Gisborne is hoping that the Government will now pay for Dame Kiri to play at a free dawn concert. Sources say they will, but the Government wants international TV coverage. For the folded concert Ticketek says they will refund tickets, but those bought directly from the organisers are out of luck as the company is going into liquidation. Most of the backers are from Ashburton and they sunk $2 million into it. Critics say the organisers were naïve, but investors aren't blaming them.

2. INCIS - The police went on a pr offensive following IBM blaming them for IBM pulling out of the INCIS contract. Police showed what the system could do for the $105 million spent on it. Critics said the old system did much of what the new one did faster, the police say trained operators were getting faster. They say the incomplete stages two and three still might be completed.

3. LA GUNMAN - The gun debate has re-ignited after a gunman opened fire on a Jewish centre full of children. Five injured, one five year old critically. Gunman believed holed up in motel. President Clinton says it was a senseless attack, many fear it was race hate influenced.

4. INDIA/PAKISTAN - India has shot down a Pakistani reconnaissance plane saying it had invaded air space. Pakistan denies it and is threatening retaliation for what it calls aggression. 17 people on board killed. It has threatened to reignite the Kashmir dispute and start another war, but this time both countries have nuclear weapons.

5. ECLIPSE - A total eclipse of the sun will be passing over Europe this evening NZ time. Last one before the millennium, but the weather is not looking good in Britain.

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