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The Dominion

INCIS: Police in five countries, including Canada and Israel, are interested in buying the Incis police computer system. Potential sales could encourage IBM and the Government to sort out their differences.

SEMINAR SPENDING: Defence Minister Max Bradford has cut the Defence Force’s training budget by $200,000 after learning that 60 staff attended a glitzy Masters of Business seminar in Auckland.

Also on the front page:

-WATSON TRIAL: The forward hatch on Watson’s yacht Blade must have been open when 176 marks resembling fingernail scratches were made on its underside, a forensic scientist said yesterday..

-MILLENNIUM CONCERT: The stars of the failed Gisborne millennium concert have been paid hundreds of thousands of dollars without having had to sing a note.

-PETROL: Mobil is raising prices another three cents a litre from midnight tonight.

Inside Headlines:

-SCIENCE BOOST: Scholarships for post-graduate science students are hinted at for Government’s plan for industry
-FISHERIES ROW: Dissent over allocation of $700 million is a recent phenomenon – Waitangi Fisheries Commission lawyer
-POLICE TO TIMOR: NZ may commit more police to Timor
-LAST NZ SHIP TO LEAVE TASMAN: The last NZ owned/operated ship will be withdrawn from service by November
-INCIS: continues from front page
-INCIS: Police have computer foundation – Doone
-SIR TIPENE UNAWARE OF CALL FOR HIM TO GO
-LOGGING CHANGES ‘WILL HURT MAORI’
-MILLENNIUM NUPTIALS BACKED
-JUDGE TO RETIRE FROM MAORI LAND COURT

MILLENNIUM CONCERT: The editorial discusses whether or not the Government’s sponsoring of a free concert at Gisborne is appropriate.

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