Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

TV1 News

SECRETS AND LIES: Allegations that an SOE used taxpayers money to try to get its way over the logging of native timber. Jenny Shipley says she stopped logging earlier than expected. Book claims Timberlands used a PR company called Shandwick to try to manipulate public opinion. Allegations about Cath Wallace and a letter to her boss. Tony Ryall and Nick Smith say there is nothing in the book that concerns them - but admit they haven't read it all. Labour expected to use this as ammunition next week.

SECRETS AND LIES: Shandwick says it's role complimented Timberlands and that the book shows they did a good job. Timberlands has also responded saying it is just a typical a conspiracy theory. Helen Clark says Mrs Shipley must explain what Timberlands has been doing.

INCIS: The government is to sue computer giant IBM for walking out on INCIS. Bill Birch says the government has filed proceedings. Yesterday the PM called for an inquiry into the police and government handling of the project. Bill Birch denies that the PM took him by surprise on the inquiry suggestion. No comment from IBM today. IBM will be planning a vigorous defence.

COURTS COMPUTER PROJECT CANNED: The Department of Courts has pulled out of a computer project after spending $2.4 million.

LEILANI REID: Netball world in shock at news of the death of Leilani Reid a former Silver Fern. Wellington Team says it is very hard to come out and play today. Lots of sad people. Reid was committed to her Samoan heritage - she wanted to be an international communicator for Pacific people.

COLD SNAP: Bad Weather has arrived - later than expected - Dunedin under a blanket of snow. Desert Road is open but motorists are advised to be careful. In South Island not as much snow as expected. Dunedin has heaviest dump for several years and two schools are closed. Met Service says the fronts are difficult to predict. Not too much problems with stock. Expected to be dangerously icy tomorrow.

DAVID BOWIE: David Bowie won't be singing in the New Millennium at Bastion Point. He has pocketed $200,000 without setting foot in NZ.

SCRATCH WINDFALL: Two girls win top prize in scratch contest after selling a ticket and then being given it back. The mystery buyer drove off after asking them to scratch it themselves. This afternoon the winner rings in and tells the two girls to keep the holiday that he won.

….

SCOTT WATSON TRIAL: Day 43: More evidence supporting crown's case on DNA. DNA expert explains the complexity of DNA analysis. "Because we haven't seen this sequence in 1500 samples this is strong evidence ". Witness does not accept that contamination was significant. Detective Bruce McLauchlan says none of the photographs or videos of Furneaux Lodge showed a mystery ketch. Submissions will be discussed tomorrow without the jury.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 


Philip Temple: Hang On A Minute, Mate
Peter Dunne quietly omits some salient facts when arguing for retention of MMP’s coat-tailing provision that allows a party to add list seats if it wins one electorate and achieves more than 1% or so of the party vote... More>>


Cheap Grace And Climate Change: Australia And COP26

It was not for everybody, but the shock advertising tactics of the Australian comedian Dan Ilic made an appropriate point. Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison, a famed coal hugger, has vacillated about whether to even go to the climate conference in Glasgow. Having himself turned the country’s prime ministerial office into an extended advertising agency, Ilic was speaking his language... More>>


Binoy Kampmark: Funeral Rites For COVID Zero
It was such a noble public health dream, even if rather hazy to begin with. Run down SARS-CoV-2. Suppress it. Crush it. Or just “flatten the curve”, which could have meant versions of all the above. This created a climate of numerical sensitivity: a few case infections here, a few cases there, would warrant immediate, sharp lockdowns, stay-at-home orders, the closure of all non-vital service outlets... More>>


Dunne Speaks: Labour's High Water Mark
If I were still a member of the Labour Party I would be feeling a little concerned after this week’s Colmar Brunton public opinion poll. Not because the poll suggested Labour is going to lose office any time soon – it did not – nor because it showed other parties doing better – they are not... More>>



Our Man In Washington: Morrison’s Tour Of Deception

It was startling and even shocking. Away from the thrust and cut of domestic politics, not to mention noisy discord within his government’s ranks, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison could breathe a sign of relief. Perhaps no one would notice in Washington that Australia remains prehistoric in approaching climate change relative to its counterparts... More>>



Binoy Kampmark: Melbourne Quake: Shaken, Not Stirred

It began just after a news interview. Time: a quarter past nine. Morning of September 22, and yet to take a sip from the brewed Turkish coffee, its light thin surface foam inviting. The Australian city of Melbourne in its sixth lockdown, its residents fatigued and ravaged by regulations. Rising COVID-19 numbers, seemingly inexorable... More>>