Celebrating 25 Years of Scoop
Special: Up To 25% Off Scoop Pro Learn More
Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Joint Food Standards Code in time for Christmas

Joint Food Standards Code in time for Christmas

Food Safety Minister Annette King says the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code comes into full effect tomorrow, just in time for Christmas.

“These are very important regulations and they have been a long time coming,” Ms King said.

“Our eating habits have become more sophisticated over the past 20 years but we have seen little change in our food regulations. When better to introduce new regulations than at Christmas, a time when food plays a huge role helping to bring friends, families and loved ones together.”

Ms King said one of the main purposes of the code is to provide consumers with more information about what’s in the food they eat, while at the same time minimising regulations for manufacturers and producers.

“The balancing act between protecting public health and safety and minimising regulatory requirements can be difficult. But the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code does just that, bringing our food regulations into the 21st century. “While the code will make trans-Tasman trade easier, the biggest beneficiaries are consumers, who can now make more informed choices about the food they eat because the Code requires comprehensive labelling on most foods.

“Manufacturers are required to provide Nutrition Information Panels on their products outlining the amount of energy (kilojoules), protein, total fat, saturated fat, total carbohydrates, sugars and sodium. This improved labelling will support the National Dietary Guidelines.

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

“For consumers with allergies to common foods like nuts, seafood, fish, milk, gluten, eggs and soybeans, the news is even better. Under the code manufacturers are required to declare on labels whether their product contains these items regardless of how little the amount. This is a major breakthrough.”

Ms King said the code also defines the difference between ‘use-by’ and ‘best before’ dates. Use-by dates are to be used where there are health and safety concerns, and food must not be sold after the use-by date has expired. Best before dates reflect the last date on which food is expected to retain maximum quality, but where there are no health and safety concerns.

Manufacturers have had two years to get used to the code’s new requirements so most foods should be compliant. “However, there is a grace period where foods packaged and produced lawfully prior to December 20 can be sold for a further 12 or 24 months depending on the length of the shelf life of the product.

“Food safety is vital to the health and economy of this country and these improved food standards will not only enhance public health and safety but reinforce New Zealand’s position as a trusted supplier of food,” Ms King said.

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels


 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.