Celebrating 25 Years of Scoop
Special: Up To 25% Off Scoop Pro Learn More
Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

A real commitment needed for rail to meet future

A real commitment needed for rail to meet future demands


National’s reluctant commitment to KiwiRail is a sign of a Government that would prefer to see more heavy freight on our roads than on rail, Labour’s Transport spokesperson Darren Hughes said today.

“The Government’s tentative support of KiwiRail is to be applauded but in the wider transport context it shows Transport Minister Steven Joyce remains obsessed with building motorways,” Darren Hughes said.

“The $750 million dollars for KiwiRail looks miserly when you consider Steven Joyce has committed $11 billion to build his ‘Roads of National Significance’.

“The National Freight Demands Study in 2008 predicted a 75 percent growth in total freight movement by 2031. Rail needs to be a major player in meeting the extra demand and volumes.

“The Government needs to take a long term view of how it’s cutting up its Transport spend. With the volume of freight expected to skyrocket over the next twenty years, New Zealand needs a balanced transport system to ensure freight is moved efficiently.

“Labour also urges the Government to think very carefully when considering closing regional lines. Many of those lines are vital in emergencies and are operating effectively.

“Rail must be a vital part of New Zealand’s future freight equation. National’s plan for KiwiRail suggests it won’t,” Darren Hughes said.

ENDS


Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels


 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.