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Apprenticeships support kicks off today

Hon Chris Hipkins
Minister of Education

Hon Carmel Sepuloni
Minister for Social Development

Hon Willie Jackson
Minister for Employment

Two employment schemes – one new and one expanded – going live today will help tens of thousands of people continue training on the job and support thousands more into work, the Government has announced.

Apprenticeship Boost, a subsidy of up to $12,000 per annum for first year apprentices and $6,000 per annum for second year apprentices for employers of new and existing apprentices is available from today. An extra $30.3 million in funding for an expanded Mana in Mahi – a programme to help people into long-term work with recognised industry qualifications – is also available from 5 August.

“This Government recognises the challenges people and firms are facing with this 1-in-100 year shock. We need to do everything we can to keep New Zealanders working, keep them training and help people to find work particularly in areas where there are skills shortages,” Minister of Education Chris Hipkins said.

“Without initiatives like Apprenticeship Boost, we risk losing our apprentices and facing a massive skills shortage on the other side of the pandemic, like we did after the Global Financial Crisis. Investing in our people is the focus of the Government’s five-point plan for the economy as New Zealand rebuilds.”

Employment Minister Willie Jackson said there is clearly a demand for the Mana in Mahi Programme so it’s pleasing to be able to extend Mana in Mahi as it celebrates two years this month of supporting people with a holistic transition into work.

“The changes we have made to Mana in Mahi will also better support a wider range of people, including workers of all ages who may have to retrain due to the economic impacts of COVID-19,” he said.

Investing in employment support

Minister for Social Development Carmel Sepuloni said MSD has received more funding to help both current clients and new job seekers get back into work.

“An additional $54 million has been allocated to MSD to assist people get back into work. This funding will be allocated to a number of MSD programmes that help support people retain work, retrain or move into different industries where there are good job opportunities.

“We know that these challenging times require us to ensure our employment support response remains fit for purpose. It will support MSD to be better able to both place and keep people in work – and be a critical part of our broader economic recovery,” Carmel Sepuloni said.

This funding builds upon the initial $150 million for the Employment Service Response to COVID-19 initiative announced as part of the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund foundational package.

The Apprenticeship Boost and the expanded Mana in Mahi scheme are administered by MSD and can be found here: https://www.workandincome.govt.nz/work/apprentice-support/index.html

EDITORS NOTES:

Apprenticeship Boost applications open

• The Apprenticeship Boost initiative will help keep first and second year apprentices employed and training towards their qualification.

• Through Apprenticeship Boost, employers will be paid at $1,000 a month for apprentices in their first 12 months of training, and $500 a month for apprentices in their second 12 months of training.

• Apprenticeship Boost payments will be made to employers of eligible apprentices after all the relevant information has been provided.

Mana in Mahi expanded

• Mana in Mahi has exceeded targets set each year to put people into employment and formal training since it started in 2018.

• For the year ending 30 June 2020, 832 people had been placed into Mana in Mahi opportunities.

• The expanded scheme starts today with employers offered double the amount of support from 12 to 24 months, dependent on their employee’s training pathway.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
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