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Weekly Select Committee Report

SELECT COMMITTEE BUSINESS

1 October 1999 to 8 October 1999

Committee meetings

There were nine committee meetings this week, all of which were held in the parliamentary buildings.

No further select committee meetings are scheduled.


Reports presented (2)

M_ori Affairs
- Ng_ti T_rangitukua Claims Settlement Bill (303–2)

Regulations Review
- Complaints relating to the Accident Insurance (Insurer’s Liability to Pay Costs of Treatment) Regulations 1999 (I. 16V)


Bills referred to select committees
The following government bills were referred to select committees:

Business Law Reform Bill (Commerce Committee)
Crimes Amendment Bill (No.6) (Justice and Law Reform Committee)
Criminal Justice Amendment Bill (No.7) (Health Committee)
Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Amendment Bill (No.2) (Transport and Environment Committee)
Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care) Bill (Health Committee)
Legal Services Bill (Justice and Law Reform Committee)
Misuse of Drugs Amendment Bill (No.4) (Health Committee)
Sale of Liquor Amendment Bill (No.3) (Commerce Committee)
Statutes Amendment Bill (No.7) (Government Administration Committee)
Student Loan Scheme Amendment Bill (No.6) (Education and Science Committee)
Te Ture Whenua Maori Amendment Bill (M_ori Affairs Committee)
Victims’ Rights Bill (Justice and Law Reform Committee)
Committee notes

(for further information on an item, please contact the committee staff noted in brackets)


Maori Affairs (Jamesa Marino-Fritzsch, Denise Te Karu)

The committee reported on the Ng_ti T_rangitukua Claims Settlement Bill this week. The bill compensates the hapu (a sub-tribe of Tuwharetoa) for land taken under a compulsory order in 1964 for Turangi township to support the Tongariro power scheme.

The committee’s commentary and Rana Waitai’s minority view highlighted concerns with some aspects of the settlement, particularly the mandate and ratification assessment process, the Taupo District Council’s continued control and management of tribal reserves and the perceived alienation of hapu constituents from their collective identity through the implementation of a Right of First Refusal process.


Regulations Review (Shelley Banks)

The committee presented its report on Complaints relating to the Accident Insurance (Insurer’s Liability to Pay Costs of Treatment) Regulations 1999 (I.16V) on Monday, 4 October 1999. The New Zealand Council of Trade Unions and the New Zealand Law Society complained that the regulations were inconsistent with the Accident Insurance Act 1998, breached workers rights recognised in international law, and contained subject matter that ought not to be in regulations. The committee’s report concludes that the complaints are not made out.

However, the committee recommends to the Government that a costing exercise be carried out as part of the review of the regulations to ensure that treatment costs are reasonable and are consistent with the intention expressed to the committee, that New Zealand is moving to comply with International Labour Organisation Convention 17.

The Regulations Review Committee held its last meeting for the 45th Parliament on Wednesday, 6 October 1999.


Transport and Environment (David Bagnall, Karen Smyth)
The meeting of the committee scheduled for Wednesday, 6 October 1999 was cancelled.


Carrying over of business before select committees

The House has resolved to carry over many items of business to the new Parliament, including much of the business before select committees. The motion is the responsibility of a Minister (usually the Leader of the House), and may be moved without notice.

Only items referred to committees by the House or under Standing Orders or other resolutions of the House may be carried over. During the development of the carry over motion, committees identify business they wish to be carried forward to the new Parliament. This information is gathered and provided to the Leader of the House, after which the Government finalises the motion. During this process, the Business Committee and other members may be consulted.

When the new Parliament commences, items of business that have been carried over will resume at the same stage they have reached at the dissolution of this Parliament.
Items before select committees will be re-allocated by the House to particular committees once they have been established. Changes to the subject structure of select committees will need to be taken into account at this time.

Items that were not included in the carry over motion will lapse when Parliament is dissolved (on 18 October 1999). Two bills before select committees will lapse at this time: the Meat Amendment Bill and the Parliamentary Privilege Bill. All inquiries will lapse (as none have been referred by the House), as will those petitions that were not carried over.

The resolution of the House to carry business forward to the new Parliament will be reproduced in the next editions of the Parliamentary Bulletin and the Journal.


Closing dates for submissions on bills
Submissions are being received on the following bill with the closing date shown:

Government Administration
Parliamentary Service (1 November 1999)


General

You can find further information about select committees on our web site at www.clerk.parliament.govt.nz. If you require additional information or have any feedback on the contents, please contact:

Compiled in the Select Committee Office, Office of the Clerk, 8 October 1999

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