Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Spectrum Sale To Maori Not Illegal

Office Of The Race Relations Conciliator

The Race Relations Conciliator today released the Opinion, formed by the full Human Rights Commission, that the Government did not breach the race provisions of the Human Rights Act by reserving one of the four blocks of the third generation radio spectrum for a pan-Maori Trust.

Mr Maurice Williamson MP and five others had complained to the Race Relations Conciliator that the sale breached the race provisions of the Human Rights Act. The complainants had asked the Conciliator to undertake a formal investigation of the decision, which they believed advantaged one group of people by virtue of their race.

Dr Prasad said today that the Government, in its submissions, explained that its decision to sell one of the four blocks to Maori only was its response to the under-representation of Maori in the knowledge economy.

Dr Prasad said: “The law permits discrimination under certain conditions. If a group of people, such as the disabled, women, single parents, the unemployed or a particular ethnic group needs special assistance for advancing to a level broadly similar to other groups in the community, then such measures are allowed under the Human Rights Act”.

“Evidence was presented to show that Maori are under-represented in tertiary education in those areas which are related to the knowledge economy, technology and telecommunications. These include engineering, architecture, town planning, science, commerce, business, medicine, law, agriculture and horticulture,” said Dr Prasad.

“Data was also produced to show that Maori lag behind significantly in employment in knowledge-based industries. These include scientific research, technical services, computer services, libraries, electronic equipment manufacturing, telecommunication services, film and video services and television services,” said Dr Prasad.

“Providers of a public service who intend addressing those who need assistance or advancement in order to achieve an equal place with others in the community, are protected even though their actions would otherwise constitute non-compliance with the race provisions of the Human Rights Act.

Dr Prasad said: “The Government, in this case, had acted in good faith, and there was clear evidence of Maori under-representation in the knowledge economy. Furthermore, it had carefully set up a mechanism, the Maori Spectrum Charitable Trust, to address the needs of an under-represented group, Maori, to reach equality with others in the knowledge economy, technology and telecommunications areas”.

“The Trust is charged with increasing the participation of Maori in the knowledge economy by promoting training, skills development, educational opportunities and research activities. It is also required to facilitate access to business mentors and other learning experiences,” added Dr Prasad

“The real merits of this mechanism to address under-representation are that it is a thoughtful response to a real issue, it has built-in checks and balances, it has been convincingly explained, it will be monitored and it will cease when it is no longer necessary,” said Dr Prasad.


For further information contact Rajen Prasad, Race Relations Conciliator on (09) 307 2352 or 021 444 177.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The Erebus Memorial In Parnell

Social media can be a wonderful tool for bringing people together in a common cause. It can also be a seedbed and spreader of mis-information on a community-wide scale. To which category do the protests against the siting of an Erebus memorial (to the 257 New Zealanders who died in that tragedy) in a secluded corner of a Parnell park happen to belong? IMO, it is clearly the latter, and the reasons for thinking so are explained below... More>>

 

National: Proposed Hate Speech Laws A Step Too Far

Reports of the Government’s proposed new hate speech laws go a step too far and risk sacrificing the freedoms New Zealanders enjoy, National’s Justice spokesperson Simon Bridges says. “The reforms are supposedly including protections to every ... More>>

ALSO:

Agriculture: Government To Phase Out Live Exports By Sea

The Government has announced that the export of livestock by sea will cease following a transition period of up to two years, said Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. “At the heart of our decision is upholding New Zealand’s reputation for high ... More>>

ALSO:

Norman Gemmell: New Zealand’s New Housing Policy Is Really Just A New Tax Package — And It’s A Shambles

Norman Gemmell , Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington Economists like to talk about “optimal policy instruments” — essentially, policies that achieve their objectives more effectively or efficiently than the alternatives, and ... More>>

Claire Breen: ACC’s Policy Of Not Covering Birth Injuries Is One More Sign The System Is Overdue For Reform

Claire Breen , University of Waikato Recent media coverage of women not being able to get treatment for birth injuries highlights yet another example of gender bias in healthcare in New Zealand. More>>

Police: Police Accept Findings Of IPCA Report Into Photographs Taken At Checkpoint

Police accept the findings of a report by the Independent Police Conduct Authority (IPCA) relating to photographs taken at a checkpoint in Northland. On November 16, 2019, Police set up a checkpoint down the road from a fight night event in Ruakaka ... More>>

ALSO:

Health: Drug-Testing Law To Be Made Permanent

Interim legislation that is already proving to keep people safer from drugs will be made permanent, Health Minister Andrew Little says. More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels