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CCS Welcomes More Accessible Public Transport

MEDIA RELEASE

1 March 2007

CCS Welcomes More Accessible Public Transport

CCS appreciates the government are improving public transport for disabled people although has concerns about Regional Councils’ future responsiveness and the use of the Human Rights Commission’s “Accessible Journey” report.

CCS welcomes moves to make commercial public transport services more accessible after Transport Minister Annette King’s recent announcement on government plans for accessible public transport.

“We want to bring the government back to key recommendations from the Human Rights Commission’s “Accessible Journey” report, for instance, the national design standards and that disabled people be involved at every stage. The Minister’s proposal doesn’t seem to have taken these recommendations into account,” says Paul Gibson, National Policy Manager, CCS.

The disability advocacy and support group says that with Regional Councils being individually responsible to provide better local transport services for people with disabilities, it has concerns about consistency and accountably.

“Accessible public transport for people with disabilities is hugely important. It means that people are able to be included in their community,” said Paul Gibson. “Disabled people are able to do the same things as everyone else - work, shop, play sport and access education – essentially give back to their community.”

ENDS

CCS Background Information

CCS works in partnership with disabled people, their families and whanau to ensure equality of opportunity, quality of life and an environment that enhances full community integration and participation.

CCS exists to make a difference for disabled people, their families and whanau by removing barriers to inclusion and by offering support to disabled people to access all ordinary opportunities in their communities. Our community is made up of disabled people and their families and whanau, who live in Aotearoa New Zealand. We include all people who face barriers to inclusion on the basis of disability and who want to access the disability support services we provide.

Reflecting the commitment in the New Zealand Disability Strategy – Making A World of Difference Whakanui Oranga [Minister for Disability Issues April 2001], a key expectation of CCS work is that the New Zealand community grows its capacity to ensure that disabled people have the same rights, choices, opportunities and safeguards as other citizens.

CCS operates with a National Office and regional management structure, providing services nationally from 16 incorporated societies. We deliver regular services to over 6,000 people with disabilities making us one of the largest disability support service providers in New Zealand. CCS works closely with other disability agencies to ensure we make best use of shared knowledge and resources, helping us to adopt best practice across the sector.

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