Scoop has an Ethical Paywall
Work smarter with a Pro licence Learn More

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

How New Zealanders stopped an unfair copyright law

Media Release
Auckland, 1 December 2009

Guilt Upon Accusation: how New Zealanders stopped an unfair copyright law

© kiwiright from nu4mz on Vimeo.

Kiwiright tells the story of the Internet Blackout, spearheaded by the Creative Freedom Foundation. Hundreds of thousands of people protested against the controversial law change, Section 92A of the Copyright Amendment Act, that would allow copyright holders to seek disconnection of Internet users’ accounts simply on accusation of a breach of copyright law without a trial.

The campaign made waves worldwide and the uproar led to newly elected Prime Minister John Key suspending that section of the law. He rightly described the law as “draconian” while noting that "If New Zealand was to sign a free-trade agreement with America for instance, we would need an equivalent of Section 92A".

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

Kiwiright takes a look at how New Zealand copyright law is dictated by foreign corporations, with a Free Trade Agreement carrot dangled in front of bureaucrats if they gave the copyright holders the disconnection stick.

Davidow says: “The Internet is a civil right these days, no different to having phone, TV and postal service. Yet, the draconian law would see people disconnected for being accused of accessing files that may or may not be under copyright.”

The documentary features interviews with politicians, artists and technologists, explaining the deeper issues around the copyright controversy.

Kiwiright can be viewed on the web at www.Kiwiright.com

Quotes from Kiwiright

Creative Freedom Foundation co-founder Bronwyn Holloway-Smith: “I was really concerned that the people pushing for this law were claiming to represent artists, but really they had other corporate interests in mind.”

Hon Peter Dunne, leader of United Future and Revenue Minister: “… I can certainly see that there would be people saying ‘better not do that, we don’t want go there, because we don’t want to upset the USA.’ Not because we’re timid little Kiwis but because our bigger objective is getting this free trade agreement.”

Tech journalist Juha Saarinen: “New Zealand is a testing ground for all these weird things...We’re giving a whole lot of power to the corporations that don’t have the public good as their interest.”

Public screenings of Kiwiright are planned for December, in Auckland and Wellington – please go to www.facebook.com/kiwiright for dates, times and further details.

Josh Davidow is the director of “Kiwiright” and a graduate student in screen production at the University of Auckland.

For more information on copyright issues, go to Creative Freedom Foundation’s website: www.creativefreedom.org.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines


Gordon Campbell: On The Perils Of Joining AUKUS Pillar Two


The lure for New Zealand to join the AUKUS military alliance is that membership of only its “second pillar” will still (supposedly) give us access to state of the art military technologies. As top US official Kurt Campbell said during his visit to Wellington a year ago:
...We've been gratified by how many countries want to join with us to work with cutting-edge technologies like in the cyber arena, hypersonics, you can go down a long list and it's great to hear that New Zealand is interested...
More


 
 

Government: Backs Police To Crackdown On Gangs
The coalition Government is restoring law and order by providing police new tools to crack down on criminal gangs, says Justice Minister Paul Goldsmith and Police Minister Mark Mitchell. “Over the last five years gangs have recruited more than 3000 members, a 51 per cent increase... More


Government: Retiring Chief Of Navy Thanked For His Service

Defence Minister Judith Collins has thanked the Chief of Navy, Rear Admiral David Proctor, for his service as he retires from the Royal New Zealand Navy after 37 years. Rear Admiral Proctor will retire on 16 May to take up an employment opportunity in Australia... More

Government: Humanitarian Support For Gaza & West Bank

Winston Peters has announced NZ is providing a further $5M to respond to the extreme humanitarian need in Gaza and the West Bank. “The impact of the Israel-Hamas conflict on civilians is absolutely appalling," he said... More


Government: New High Court Judge Appointed

Judith Collins has announced the appointment of Wellington Barrister Jason Scott McHerron as a High Court Judge. Justice McHerron graduated from the University of Otago with a BA in English Literature in 1994 and an LLB in 1996... More

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels


 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.