Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Sanford recommends Hoki TACC be left at current level

Sanford recommends you leave the Hoki TACC at the current level. (We support Option 1)

Officials are currently considering options for a final advice paper for you on revising the Hoki Total Allowable Commercial Catch (TACC). Two options have been put forward for stakeholder consultation;

Option 1 is status quo;

Option 2 is to lift the TACC by 10,000mt in the western stock.

Sanford supports Option 1.

We note your recent public comments (Press Release 22 June 2011) about the positive state of the resource and its recovery. We think the resource is more positive than it has been in recent years but we ask you to take a precautionary approach until there is an opportunity for further scientific data and information to be collected and analysed.

In the early 2000’s and in subsequent years Sanford were in the minority calling for HOK TACC reductions but were ignored because the ‘best available science’ said the fishery could sustain taking over 200,000mt. In 2003-04 again the ‘best available science’ said we could take 180,000mt yet despite more than sufficient capacity and massive effort, industry could only manage to harvest 135,000mt. The reductions came too late and were too small; Industry paid a heavy price for that with the TACC eventually being lowered to 90,000mt. As a result the industry needed to restructure; companies downsized their fleets and a lot of onwater and shore-based capital went under-utilised and jobs were lost.

In the period July to September 2009 the industry took the permitted 25,000mt from the Western Stock. Since then with transfers from the East and two TACC increases the take from the Western Stock is now 60,000mt.

This means that since 2009 we will have taken an additional 105,000mt of hoki all from the Western stock without having seriously measured the impact of this additional extraction. In Sanford’s opinion it is time to pause and take stock. A further increase this year is too much, too fast.

Sanford commissioned a report by Dr Kevin Stokes (copy attached) and shared this with others active in the hoki fishery. Response has been positive and a number of quota owners are now supportive of maintaining the status quo.

There is no doubt that hoki is a valuable year round fishery that New Zealand can take pride in. The fishery has been certified by the Marine Stewardship Council since 2001 and despite a diminishing biomass in the early 2000s the fishery has pulled back and is now rebuilding. In time, the hoki fishery will again be robust enough to support a higher TACC.

Sanford asks that you hold back announcing TACC increases until the working group and your fishery managers have had time to consider the survey results timetabled to occur over the next 12 months. The 2011-12 Sub Antarctic trawl survey is due to begin in December 2011; the West Coast trawl survey is scheduled for August 2012. Both surveys will assist in determining how quickly the hoki stock is rebuilding.

An incremental (and considered) upward TACC climb is preferential for managing both capital decisions and re-gaining the public’s confidence in hoki management.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Coronavirus: On The Addiction To Chinese Student Fees, And A Possible Future For RNZ Concert

Last week, Australian PM Scott Morrison extended its ban on foreign visitors from or passing through from mainland China – including Chinese students - for a third week. New Zealand has dutifully followed suit, with our travel ban extending until next Monday at least, presumably dependent to some extent on what Morrison decides to do later this week.
Our universities are now asking for an exemption to the travel ban for their Chinese students, who would still, the universities assure us, be subjected to strict quarantine procedures upon arrival. Given how the inability of the university system to care for its own students on campus made world news last year, that promise may not do much to reduce the coronavirus fears among the wider New Zealand public. More>>


 

Water Woes: Wellington Reflects National Problem

Water utilities right across the country face major challenges to upgrade and maintain their underground three waters network. Water New Zealand’s Technical Manager, Noel Roberts says Wellington’s waste water woes are not unique to the capital city... More>>

ALSO:

2020 And Beyond: National’s Economic Plan

National Leader Simon Bridges has today outlined National’s economic plan heading into election 2020. “National understands the economy and how it impacts on New Zealanders day to day lives... More>>

ALSO:

Abortion Legislation Committee: Abortion Bill Report Presented To The House

The Abortion Legislation Committee has presented its report on the Abortion Legislation Bill to the House. A copy of the report is available here. The bill seeks to have abortion services provided like other health services... More>>

ALSO:


Local Government NZ: New Report A Pathfinder For Affordable Housing

A report released today by LGNZ provides a roadmap for councils finding their way through the complex policy, regulatory and market tools available to help enable more affordable housing developments for New Zealanders. With demand soaring, rents ... More>>

ALSO:

“Can Do Better”: Sallies Election Year Report Card

This year’s State of the Nation report by The Salvation Army offers a mixed bag of outcomes, with some significant headline progress - but also an ambitious list of “can do better”. Government action is delivering limited improvements... More>>

ALSO:


 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 


 

InfoPages News Channels