Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Dramatic improvement in forest industry safety record

Dramatic improvement in forest industry safety record

Following a spate of workplace deaths in 2013, New Zealand’s forestry industry has set a shining example in improved safety performance nationally over the past three years. Annual serious harm incident rates dropped in half over the past two years. The numbers dropped from 160 incidents in 2013, to 107 in 2014 and then to 79 in 2015.

Even more striking – the rate of serious harm in production forestry has dropped to less of one-third of the rate in 2008. This is based on annual forest harvest volumes lifting from less than 20 million cubic metres per annum to over 30 million in that period.

Figure 1: Reduced Forestry Serious Harm from 2008 through 2015

From June 2013 forest industry leaders from forest management and contracting convened an action group. This led co-funding an independent working party to conduct a national review that made recommendations during 2014 on key issues to be addressed to reduce workplace harm across the forest industry.

• Leaders in both industry and government acted decisively on the advice of the Independent Forest Safety Review to boost safety resources and take key actions.

• During 2015 forest manager and contractor leaders, including worker representatives, formed the Forest Industry Safety Council (FISC). FISC was fortunate to recruit Dame Alison Paterson as chair and Fiona Ewing as safety director. They have taken a practical and inclusive approach with all industry stakeholders. A comprehensive Injury prevention programme has been set up based on risk assessment and incident data.

• Coincidental with the safety review and safety council formation forest industry leaders showed considerable leadership to take new technology in mechanised harvesting onto the most dangerous tree-felling workplace. Traction assisted harvesters are now replacing manual tree fallers wherever possible in corporate forests. These machines isolate workers from the key risks in tree falling.

• Since 2013 over $70 million has been invested in new harvesters capable of working on forests on steep slopes. Machinery technology and developments continue to be led by forest contractors and local manufacturers with close communication, backing and support of the forest managers they work with.

• As a result of both increased injury prevention funding work and mechanisation, the rate of serious harm incidents in forestry has dropped dramatically and constantly since 2008, This is measured against annual roundwood removals from data collected by WorkSafe NZ (formerly Department of Labour) and Ministry of Primary Industries. (Refer Figure 1.)


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines


Gordon Campbell: On Covid Vaccine Inequality, Plus Cowboy Bebop


Plainly, the Big Pharma model – where vaccine development, distribution, and pricing is left in the hands of the private sector - is not fit for purpose when it comes to meeting the global challenge of Covid vaccine coverage. Last week, Amnesty International released a major report on how the global response to the pandemic is only accentuating the inequalities... More>>


Government: Self-isolation Pilot To Start With 150 People


The goal of safely re-opening our borders and developing new ways for people to travel will start with a self-isolation pilot, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins confirmed today. “As part of the Reconnecting New Zealanders plan announced in August, the self-isolation pilot will look at self-isolation for vaccinated travellers... More>>

ALSO:




 
 



Government: Details Of Interest Deductibility Rules Released

The Government has released the draft legislation outlining the details of the policy limiting the deductibility of interest costs on residential property investments.
Finance Minister Grant Robertson said the interest limitation proposals... More>>

ALSO:


Wellington Council: Mayor Suggests UK-style Arts-sector Insurance Scheme
It’s time New Zealand thought about an arts and events sector insurance scheme, not unlike that in the United Kingdom, says Wellington Mayor Andy Foster. His call follows the cancellation of the World of WearableArts 2021 show... More>>

Government: Next Steps To Improve Safety In Wake Of Whakaari White Island Tragedy
The Government is moving to improve safety in light of the Whakaari White Island tragedy and has released proposals to reinforce safety standards in registered adventure activities... More>>

Land Air Water: Two-thirds Of NZ’s Monitored River Sites Ecologically Impaired

Today, the Land, Air, Water Aotearoa (LAWA) project has released the LAWA River Water Quality National Picture Summary 2021, alongside updated river monitoring result histories for more than 1500 individual sites across New Zealand... More>>

Power: Bill Changes Bring Fairness To Charges

A key recommendation of an independent panel to make electricity charges fairer across all households will be put in place, the Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods has announced... More>>



Government: Parks expiry of licenses, WoFs and regos
As a result of the Delta outbreak, driver licences, Warrants of Fitness (WoFs), Certificates of Fitness (CoFs), vehicle licences (‘regos’) and licence endorsements that expired on or after 21 July 2021 will be valid until 30 November 2021, Transport Minister Michael Wood has announced today... More>>


 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels