Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Your clean laundry can leave a dirty carbon footprint


Auckland, 24 August 2018. As recent Canstar Blue research reveals that only half of New Zealanders consider the energy rating on their new washing machine or clothes dryer, we look at how consumer complacency could be costing the earth.

Commenting on the findings, Canstar Blue’s Emma Quantrill says:

“The recent focus on our use of plastics has shown that we are concerned about the impact we have on our environment, but unfortunately the results of our latest survey show we can still be blinkered in certain areas of our lives. Because household appliances, especially the ones that heat up, need power, being aware of your machines energy rating and also being mindful of the settings you use, can reduce your carbon footprint and your power bill.”

It is widely estimated that on average our laundry habits (both washing and then tumble drying), produce around 440kg of CO2 emissions per household, per year. This equates to the same as running a car for 17 hours straight or using your TV for over three months without ever turning it off.

Why are CO2 emissions important?
In very basic terms, they are a part of a family of gases commonly referred to as ‘greenhouse gases’. Greenhouses gases absorb heat, but then importantly, radiate them, heating up the environment. Although they are a natural phenomenon, our use of fossil fuels to produce energy, is one of the major contributors to an increase in greenhouse gases and much talked about global warming.

How to cut your laundry carbon footprint
By law, all new washing machines and dryers must met certain standards and display an energy efficiency label when being sold in New Zealand. When reading the labels, the general rule of thumb is, the more stars it has, the more energy efficient it is. Always bear in mind that you can only make direct comparisons on similar machines, for example, you couldn’t compare a washing machine with an eight-litre capacity to that of one with a six-litre capacity. Other top tips for cutting you laundry carbon footprint (and your bills) include:

• If you’re in the market for a new washer, work out the size of washing machine that is right for you. Go too big, or too small, and you’re literally washing your money down the drain.
• Cut down on the amount of washing you do by waiting until you have a full load.
• Think about using cooler, or cold, setting on your washing machines. Modern machines are designed to wash just as well with cold water as they are with hot.
• Line dry when possible. Your tumble dryer is one energy hungry appliance.
• When you do use it, make sure your tumble dryer is properly vented. As well as making it more efficient, it will prolong the life of your machine as the motor does not need to work as hard.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On Chilling The Warm Fuzzies About The US/China Trade Deal

Hold the champagne, folks. This week’s China/US deal is more about a change in tone between the world’s two biggest economies – thank goodness they’re not slapping more tariffs on each other! - than a landmark change in substance. The high walls of US and Chinese tariffs built in recent years will largely remain intact, and few economists are predicting the deal will significantly boost the growth prospects for a slowing US economy. As the New York Times noted this morning, the likes of New Zealand will still face the trade barriers imposed by the Trump administration during the recent rounds of fighting. More>>

 

PGF Kaikōura $10.88M: Boost In Tourism & Business

The Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) is investing $10.88 million to boost business and tourism opportunities in Kaikōura, Parliamentary Undersecretary for Regional Economic Development, Fletcher Tabuteau announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Whitebaiting: Govt Plans To Protect Announced

With several native whitebait species in decline the Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage has today released proposals to standardise and improve management of whitebait across New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Resource For Schools On Climate Change

New resource for schools to increase awareness and understanding of climate change... More>>

ALSO:

In Effect April: New Regulations For Local Medicinal Cannabis

Minister of Health Dr David Clark says new regulations will allow local cultivation and manufacture of medicinal cannabis products that will potentially help ease the pain of thousands of people. More>>

ALSO:


RNZ: New Year Honours: Sporting Greats Among Knights And Dames

Six new knights and dames, including Silver Ferns coach Dame Noeline Taurua and economist Professor Dame Marilyn Waring, have been created in today's New Year's Honours List. The list of 180 recipients - 91 women and 89 men - leans heavily on awards for community service, arts and the media, health and sport.
More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On What An Inquiry Might Look Like

Presumably, if there is to be a ministerial inquiry (at the very least) into the Whakaari/White Island disaster, it will need to be a joint ministerial inquiry. That’s because the relevant areas of responsibility seem to be so deeply interwoven... More>>

ALSO:


 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 


 

InfoPages News Channels