Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Primary teachers and principals reject latest offers


8 April 2019

Primary teachers and principals have overwhelmingly rejected the latest offers from the Ministry of Education to settle their collective agreements.

NZEI Te Riu Roa president Lynda Stuart said the outcome indicated teachers and principals were united and resolute in their commitment to getting significantly improved pay, time and support for learning needs.

“We will be going straight back to talk to the Government with that message - that it’s time to get really serious about giving us time to teach and lead, and time to take some real steps to make teaching a viable long-term career choice.”

She warned that significant disruption could occur in schools next term if the Government did not focus on finding a solution quickly.

“The solution is in the Government’s hands. We would all prefer to be in our schools focussed on teaching and learning, but members have sent a very clear message that they want to see change now. That’s why our next step is discussions with government to see how we can make progress.”

NZEI’s National Executive agreed over the weekend to call paid union meetings in the second week of next term (May 6-10). If there was no progress made by then, it is proposing that members vote on taking partial strike action by working to rule from May 15th until a national day of strike action on May 29th.

The work to rule would mean working only within 8am-5pm, Monday to Friday.

Teacher leader Margie Askin-Jarden from Christchurch said teachers showed every day and in the most extreme circumstances that they prioritised the care and learning of children.

“But the profession truly is at breaking point. We cannot continue to hold a broken system together because in the end the collateral damage is not just us, it is our children and their learning.

“Teachers in Christchurch know better than most that unless we get more resourcing for children with additional learning needs and address the extreme work and time pressure on teachers, we will continue to lose great teachers and struggle to attract new ones. That’s why teachers and principals in Christchurch voted just as strongly to reject these offers as the rest of the country, and why we support action next term if it is needed.”

Sose Annandale, a principal from Porirua on the principals’ negotiating team, said the outcome was a resounding rejection of the government’s position. The Ministry offers rejected last week were very similar to an offer previously rejected in November because the Government has refused to budge from its “envelope” of $698 million over four years.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On Rapid Antigen Testing


National Party leader Christopher Luxon is being allowed to get away with murder. Luxon is not being challenged over his repeated assertions that the rest of the world has enjoyed ready access to rapid antigen tests (aka RATS) for a year, so why aren’t we? In fact, the reality across the Tasman for the past month has seen a colossal shambles unfold over (a) the availability and (b) the affordability of these tests. RATS have become a case of panic buying on steroids. Amid reports of price gouging, stock-piling, socially inequitable access and empty shelves...
More>>



 
 


The Treasury: Financial Statements Of The Government Of NZ For The 5 Months Ended 30 November 2021
Interim Financial Statements of the Government of New Zealand for the 5 months ended 30 November 2021... More>>

ALSO:


Government: Announces Three Phase Public Health Response To Omicron
The Government has announced a three phase Omicron plan that aims to slow down and limit the spread of an outbreak, Associate Minister of Health, Dr Ayesha Verrall announced today. “Through the course of managing Omicron, we will be taking a phased approach. As case numbers grow both testing and isolation approaches will change in response... More>>


Save The Children: Thousands Join Call To Retain New Zealand’s Children’s Commissioner

More than 6000 Kiwis have joined Save the Children New Zealand’s call to retain the vital role of Children’s Commissioner, as the Government considers a new bill proposing major changes to the office, including the removal of a named Children’s Commissioner... More>>


TradeMe: New Zealand Rents Climb $40 Per Week In One Year

New Zealand’s national median rent climbed $40 a week in 2021 to reach $560 in December, according to Trade Me’s latest Rental Price Index. Trade Me Property Sales Director Gavin Lloyd said last month’s national median weekly rent showed an 8 per cent annual increase... More>>


Transparency International: New Zealand Retains Top Ranking In Annual Corruption Perceptions Index
New Zealand is once again ranked least corrupt in the world by Transparency International’s annual Corruption Perceptions Index. This year New Zealand’s score of 88 out of 100 is unchanged resulting in it being first equal with Denmark and Finland... More>>


TradeMe: Property Prices Increase By A Record 25% In One Year
In December, the national average asking price jumped by a quarter year on year, to reach a new high of $956,150, according to the latest Trade Me Property Price Index. Trade Me Property Sales Director Gavin Lloyd said last month’s national average asking price increase was the largest on record... More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels