Video | Business Headlines | Internet | Science | Scientific Ethics | Technology | Search

 

Spring Climate Summary

Spring Climate Summary

A dry spring for many parts of the country

RainfallRainfall was well below normal (< 50%) in Nelson and Marlborough, and below normal (50-79%) in eastern and inland parts of the South Island. In addition, southern, western, central and northern parts of the North Island received below normal rainfall. In contrast, rainfall was above normal (120-149%) or well above normal (> 149%) in Gisborne and Hawke’s Bay.
TemperatureSpring temperatures were near average (-0.50°C to + 0.50°C) for most of the country. The exception was parts of western Waikato, southern Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa, the inland Canterbury Plains and Stewart Island where temperatures were below average (-1.20°C to -0.51°C).
Soil moistureAs of 1 December 2015, soil moisture levels were below normal for the time of year for extensive areas of New Zealand. In particular, soil moisture levels were much lower than normal in eastern and northern parts of the South Island, and southern, central, western and northern parts of the North Island. Soil moisture levels were above normal in Gisborne, southern Fiordland and Stewart Island.
SunshineSpring sunshine was abundant for southern, eastern, central and northern areas of the South Island, and parts of the central North Island, Bay of Plenty and Northland where sunshine totals were typically above normal (110-125%).

Overview

Spring 2015 saw strong El Niño conditions persist in the Tropical Pacific. Overall, the season was characterised by mean sea level pressures that were higher than normal over Australia and the Tasman Sea, while lower pressures than normal occurred to the south-east of New Zealand. This pressure pattern resulted in a south-westerly airflow anomaly over much of the country, which is a characteristic of El Niño during spring. Rainfall was well below normal (< 50% of the spring normal) in Nelson and Marlborough, and below normal (50-79% of the spring normal) in most remaining areas of the South Island. The exceptions were coastal areas of Southland and Otago (south of Oamaru), where rainfall was near normal (within 20% of the spring normal). In the North Island, rainfall was typically below normal in Wellington, Wairarapa, Manawatu-Whanganui, Taranaki, southern and central Waikato and northern Northland. In contrast, rainfall was above normal (120-149% of the spring normal) or well above normal (> 149% of the spring normal) in Gisborne and Hawke’s Bay. This was likely to be as a result of two heavy rain events which occurred in these regions around mid-September and early-November. Remaining areas of the North Island typically received near average rainfall for the season. Soil moisture levels were near normal for many parts of the country in early spring. The notable exceptions were parts of coastal Hurunui, South Canterbury and North Otago where soil moisture levels were below normal for the time of year. Due to the prevalence of south-westerlies during spring, which are typical of El Niño, soils in many eastern areas became increasingly dry as the season progressed. As of 1 December 2015, soil moisture levels were below normal for the time of year for extensive areas of New Zealand, but especially for Canterbury, Nelson, Marlborough, Wellington, Wairarapa, Taranaki, southern Waikato and Northland. Soil moisture levels were above normal in Gisborne,.

For the season as a whole, temperatures were near average (-0.50°C to + 0.50°C of the spring average) across most of the country. The exception was parts of western Waikato, southern Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa and the inland Canterbury Plains where temperatures were below average (0.51°C to 1.20°C below the spring average). Despite mostly near average temperatures for spring overall, there was noticeable variability from month-to-month. Specifically, many parts of the country observed below average temperatures in September, and above average temperatures (0.51°C to 1.20°C above the spring average) in October. The nation-wide average temperature in spring 2015 was 12.0°C (0.1°C below the 1981-2010 spring average from NIWA’s seven station temperature series which begins in 1909) .

It was a sunny spring for the Far North, inland Bay of Plenty, southern Waikato, Nelson, Marlborough, Canterbury, Otago and Southland where sunshine totals were generally above normal (110-125% of the spring normal). Remaining areas of New Zealand observed near normal spring sunshine totals (within 10% of the spring normal).

Further Highlights:
• The highest temperature was 31.7°C, observed at Hastings on 26 November.

• The lowest temperature was -8.2°C, observed at Naseby Forest on 31 October.

• The highest 1-day rainfall was 291 mm, recorded at Milford Sound on 16 October.

• The highest wind gust was 172 km/hr, observed at Cape Turnagain on 5 October and South West Cape on 7 October.

• Of the six main centres in spring 2015, Auckland was the warmest, Dunedin was the coolest, Christchurch was the driest and sunniest, Hamilton was the wettest and Auckland was the cloudiest.

• Of the available, regularly reporting sunshine observation sites, the sunniest four locations so far in 2015 (1 January to 30 November) are: Blenheim (2519 hours), Whakatane (2476 hours), Appleby (2456 hours) and Lake Tekapo (2423 hours).

Full Report: Spring Climate Summary

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Reserve Bank: Ongoing Monetary Tightening
The Monetary Policy Committee today increased the Official Cash Rate (OCR) to 3 percent from 2.5 percent. The Committee agreed it remains appropriate to continue to tighten monetary conditions... More>>



Statistics: Weekly Earnings Rise As More In Full-time Employment

Median weekly earnings from wages and salaries rose by 8.8 percent to $1,189 in the year to the June 2022 quarter, Stats NZ said today... More>>



Bell Gully: Uncertainty Ahead With New Unconscionable Conduct Legislation

new prohibition against ‘unconscionable conduct’ in trade is one of a number of changes to the Fair Trading Act 1986 that come into force from 16 August 2022. The new prohibition may have wide-ranging implications for many businesses... More>>


Electricity Authority: Imposes Interim Restrictions On Very Large Electricity Contracts

Consumers of electricity will be protected from potentially paying more than they should due to the impact of very large electricity contracts on wholesale prices, under urgent changes announced today by the Electricity Authority... More>>


Westpac: Economic Overview, August 2022 – Pushing Through

The New Zealand economy faces some lean growth in the year ahead as households’ budgets are squeezed, according to Westpac’s latest Economic Overview... More>>


Kiwi Group Holdings: Fisher Funds Acquires Kiwi Wealth Business

Kiwi Group Holdings Limited (KGHL) today announced the sale of Kiwi Wealth to Fisher Funds for NZ$310 million... More>>