Search

 

Cablegate: 2003-2004 Incsr Submission - Mozambique

This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 03 MAPUTO 001752

SIPDIS
STATE FOR INL, AF/S, AF/RSA
JUSTICE FOR OIA, AFMLS, AND NDDS
TREASURY FOR FINCEN
DEA FOR OILS AND OFFICE OF DIVERSION CONTROL
E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: SNAR EFIN KCRM PTER PGOV MZ KCOR
SUBJECT: 2003-2004 INCSR SUBMISSION - MOZAMBIQUE

REF: A) STATE 324347
B) STATE 328024
1. Per ref A, below is post's submission for 2003-2004
INCSR:

I. Summary
Mozambique is a transit country for illegal drugs (hashish,
herbal cannabis, cocaine, mandrax (methaqualone), and
heroin) consumed in Europe and South Africa. Some hashish
shipments passing through Mozambique find their way to the
United States and Canada. The country's porous borders,
poorly policed seacoast, and inadequately trained and
equipped law enforcement agencies facilitate transshipment
of narcotics to South Africa. Drug production is limited to
herbal cannabis cultivation and mandrax laboratories.
Available evidence suggests significant use of herbal
cannabis and limited consumption of "club drugs"(Ecstasy,
etc.), prescription medicines, and heroin among the urban
elite. The Mozambican government recognizes drug use and
drug trafficking as serious problems, but has limited
resources to address these issues. Cooperation programs with
the UNODC and bilateral donors have attempted to improve
training of drug control officials and provide better
interdiction and laboratory equipment. Corruption in the
police and judiciary significantly hampers counternarcotics
efforts. Mozambique is a party to the 1998 UN Drug
Convention.

II. Status of Country
Mozambique is not a significant producer of illegal drugs.
Herbal cannabis for local consumption is produced throughout
the country, particularly in Tete, Nampula, and Cabo Delgado
provinces. Limited amounts are exported to neighboring
countries, particularly South Africa. Some factories
producing mandrax for the South African market were raided
and closed down in 1995, 2000 and 2002. Mozambique's role
has grown rapidly as a drug-transit country. Southwest Asian
producers ship cannabis resin (hashish) and synthetic drugs
through Mozambique to Europe and South Africa. Limited
quantities of these shipments may also reach the United
States and Canada. Reports from the Mozambican Office for
the Prevention and Fight Against Drugs (GCPCD) indicate that
heroin and other opiate derivatives shipped through
Mozambique originate in Southeast Asia. Increasing amounts
of cocaine from Colombia and Brazil transit Portugal and
Angola or Mozambique (all Portuguese speaking countries) on
their way to South Africa. International flights from Lisbon
to Maputo and from Dar es Salaam to Pemba provide a conduit
for smuggling into South Africa. With the assistance of the
South African police, numerous arrests were made in 2003 of
drug couriers originating in Brazil, who transit Mozambique
from Portugal on route to Johannesburg or continue through
Johannesburg to Maputo to take advantage of the relatively
lax controls disembarking in Maputo. Mozambique is not a
producer of precursor chemicals.

III. Country Actions Against Drugs in 2003
Accomplishments. Mozambique's accomplishments in meeting its
goals under the 1988 UN Drug Convention remain limited.
Government resources devoted to the counternarcotics effort
are meager, and only limited donor funds are available.
Mozambique is cooperating with the UNODC through two
assistance projects designed to increase law enforcement
capacity and border control. Local law enforcement agents in
some provinces have destroyed cannabis crops. In 1995, 2000,
and 2002, Mozambique cooperated with South Africa in raiding
Mandrax factories near Maputo. Mozambican officials also
seized assets connected with the production of mandrax, but
not assets related to profits derived from drug sales. The
Mozambican government carries out drug education programs in
local schools in cooperation with bilateral and multilateral
donors as part of its demand reduction efforts.
Law Enforcement Efforts. Mozambique's drug unit, which
operates in Maputo and reports to the Chief of the Criminal
Investigation Police, received refresher training in drug
interdiction techniques as part of a UNODC program in 2001
and 2002. Under this program, 20 officers were hired and
trained to staff drug units. Drug detection equipment was
installed at border posts, ports, and airports. Customs
officers at Maputo airport and seaport have received drug
interdiction training under a UNODC program. The UNODC is
working with customs agents at land borders as part of a
program with Mozambique, South Africa, and Swaziland.
Publicized seizures in 2003 include:
- The seizure of heroin being smuggled from Brazil via
Lisbon by two couriers at Maputo Mavalane International
Airport in October and November and the arrest in South
Africa in December of a Tanzanian national identified by the
couriers.
- The seizure by customs officials of 9.3 kilos of cocaine
found in the baggage of a passenger arriving at Mavalane
Airport in December.
- The detention of three senior police officers in
Inhambane province for trafficking in hashish and marijuana
in November 2003. The drugs were seized from a Pakistani
national in 2001.
- The seizure of 75 kilos of a chemical used in the
manufacture of mandrax found in a parked car on a busy
street in Maputo in November.
- The arrest of a Tanzanian national in May at Mavalane
Airport smuggling 2 kilograms of cocaine in his stomach.
Mozambique has not received requests for the extradition of
drug-related suspects.
Corruption. Corruption is pervasive in Mozambique.
Mozambique has not prosecuted government officials for
corruption relating to the production, processing, or
shipment of narcotic and psychotropic drugs or controlled
substances, nor has it prosecuted any individual for
discouraging the investigation or prosecution of such acts.
Agreements and Treaties. Mozambique is a party to the 1988
UN Drug Convention, the 1961 UN Single Convention on
Narcotic Drugs, as amended by the 1972 Protocol, and the
1971 UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances. Mozambique
has signed, but has not yet ratified, the UN Convention
against Transnational Organized Crime.
Cultivation/Production. Cannabis is cultivated in Nampula,
Zambezia, Niassa, Cabo Delgado, Tete, Manica, and Sofala
provinces. The Mozambican government has no estimates on
crop size. Intercropping is reportedly common.
Drug Flow/Transit. Assessments of drugs transiting
Mozambique are based upon limited seizure data and
observations of local and UNODC officials. Mozambique
increasingly serves as a transit country for hashish,
cannabis resin, heroin, and Mandrax originating in Southwest
Asia, owing to its vast, unpatrolled coastline, lack of
resources for interdiction and sea, air, and land borders,
and growing transportation links with neighboring countries.
Drugs destined for the South African and European markets
arrive in Mozambique by small ship, especially in the
coastal areas of the northern provinces, including islands
off Cabo Delgado and Nampula. The Maputo corridor border
crossing at Ressano Garcia/Lebombo is an important transit
point. Hashish and heroin are also shipped on to Europe, and
there is evidence that some hashish may reach Canada and the
United States, but not in significant quantities. Arrests in
Brazil, Mozambique and South Africa indicate cocaine is
being shipped by drug couriers from Colombia and Brazil to
Mozambique through Lisbon for onward shipment to South
Africa and East Asia. In addition, there is anecdotal
evidence that Nigerian and Tanzanian cocaine traffickers
have targeted Mozambique as a gateway to the South African
and European markets.
Domestic Programs (Demand Reduction). The primary drugs of
abuse are alcohol and herbal cannabis. Heroin, cocaine, and
"club drug" usage and prescription drug abuse are also
reported among Mozambique's urban elite. The GCPCD has
developed a drug education program for use in schools. It
has provided the material to a number of local NGOs for use
in their drug education programs. The Maputo GCPCD office
conducted an education program aimed at youth in 2001. The
program included plays and lectures in schools, churches,
and other places where youth gather. The Sofala provincial
GCPCD office has created a community volunteer educational
program. Funds were not available in 2003 for continuation
of these education programs beyond major cities. Drug abuse
and treatment options are scarce. The GCPCD is seeking donor
assistance in creating three regional treatment centers in
Maputo, Beira, and Nampula.

IV. U.S. Policy Initiatives and Programs
THE USG SENDS MOZAMBICAN LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS AND
PROSECUTORS TO REGIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMS THROUGH THE
INTERNATIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ACADEMY (ILEA) FOR AFRICA IN
BOTSWANA. LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS HAVE ALSO RECEIVED
TRAINING AT ILEA NEW MEXICO.
THE BUREAU FOR INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT
AFFAIRS PROVIDED SUPPORT TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL'S ANTI-
CORRUPTION UNIT AND THE POLICE SCIENCES ACADEMY (ACIPOL).
THE FUNDS PROVIDE FOR TRAINING, SPECIALIZED COURSE
INSTRUCTION, INSTRUCTOR DEVELOPMENT, AND CURRICULUM
DEVELOPMENT FOR ACIPOL. THE ANTI-CORRUPTION UNIT, WHICH
BEGAN OPERATIONS IN NOVEMBER 2002, HAS RECEIVED SPECIALIZED
TRAINING AND ADVISOR VISITS THROUGH THE DEPARTMENT OF
JUSTICE OPDAT PROGRAM, AS WELL AS RENOVATION OF THEIR OFFICE
FACILITY, IT EQUIPMENT, AND OFFICE FURNITURE, FUNDED BY AID.
THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ICITAP PROGRAM PROVIDES A MEDIUM-
TERM ADVISOR TO ACIPOL TO COORDINATE THESE ACTIVITIES.
The Department of Defense has assisted the Mozambican navy
to develop a plan for improved coastal surveillance
activities, and is providing training to Mozambican military
personnel. However, the USG cannot provide the Mozambican
navy with resources for coastal patrol capacity until the
Mozambican parliament establishes a codified system of
maritime law.
HANKINS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
World Headlines

 


UN: Pope's Visit To Iraq "A Symbol Of Hope"

The visit by Pope Francis to the northern Iraqi city of Mosul at the weekend will be a symbol of hope and an opportunity to join forces for peace and unity, the UN cultural agency, UNESCO, said on Thursday, ahead of his touchdown in the capital, Baghdad... More>>

Myanmar: Military Must Stop Murdering And Jailing Protestors – Bachelet

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet on Thursday said security forces in Myanmar must “halt their vicious crackdown on peaceful protestors,” following another day of deadly violence across the country on Wednesday... More>>

Syria: Economic Decline, Rising Hunger And Surging Humanitarian Needs

Syria’s fragile economy has “suffered multiple shocks” over the past 18 months, with its currency plummeting and joblessness swelling as people struggle to cover their basic needs, the UN Emergency Relief Coordinator told the Security Council ... More>>


Focus On: UN SDGs


Podcast: A UN Top Official’s Inspiring Journey To Leadership

UN Under-Secretary for Global Communications Melissa Fleming speaks to Agnes Kalibata, the Special Envoy to the 2021 Food Systems Summit, about her journey as a woman leader – from growing up as a Rwandan refugee in Uganda to becoming Rwanda’s Minister of Agriculture and now a top official at the United Nations... More>>

UNFCCC: Greater Climate Ambition Urged As Initial NDC Synthesis Report Is Published

UN Climate Change today published the Initial NDC Synthesis Report, showing nations must redouble efforts and submit stronger, more ambitious national climate action plans in 2021 if they’re to achieve the Paris Agreement goal of limiting global temperature rise by 2°C—ideally 1.5°C—by the end of the century... More>>


2021: Critical Year To ‘reset Our Relationship With Nature’ – UN Chief

During this time of “crisis and fragility”, the UN chief told the United Nations Environment Assembly on Monday that human well-being and prosperity can be vastly improved by prioritizing nature-based solutions. Painting a picture of the turmoil ... More>>