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Cablegate: Fraudulent U.S. Visas Detected at Santiago Airport

This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.

211133Z Jul 05

UNCLAS SANTIAGO 001570

SIPDIS

FOR CA/FPP AND DS/VF

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: CVIS KFRD ASEC CI CVIS
SUBJECT: FRAUDULENT U.S. VISAS DETECTED AT SANTIAGO AIRPORT

REF: Murphy/Rohlf email 7/15

1. Three subjects bearing what appear to be high-quality
fraudulent U.S. visas were intercepted at Santiago's
international airport on July 14. RSO was contacted that
morning by security staff at LAN Chile (Chilean Airlines)
and advised that they were holding four Malaysians, three of
whom had what they believed were fraudulent U.S. visas,
attempting to enter Chile on a flight from Buenos Aires,
with onward tickets on LAN Chile to Los Angeles via Lima.
RSO and ARSO interviewed the four subjects at the airport
transit lounge.
2. The four subjects, two men and two women, appeared to be
ethnic Chinese; all but one claimed not to understand
English. The one subject who did speak some English stated
that his name was Loke Heng Yew, but carried a Malaysian
passport in the name of Lam Chi Keung. The subject stated
that he had arranged a fraudulent Malaysian passport and
U.S. visa in Kuala Lumpur to facilitate illegal entry into
the United States. He then traveled to Spain on his true
Malaysian passport, upon his arrival in Spain he was
contacted by an unknown male who asked him for his real
passport. The unknown male then gave him another Malaysian
passport with a U.S. visa and told him to meet the three
other travelers and to present himself to immigration
authorities as the father of the two women. Upon arriving in
Lima, en route to the United States, he was to switch seats
with the passenger carrying a passport in the name of Loke
Heng Yew, who did not have a U.S. visa. The subject stated
that he paid about $3,000 for the fraudulent Malaysian
passport and U.S. visa.
3. All subjects eventually provided what they claimed were
their real names and dates of birth. The two women claimed
to have purchased the fraudulent passports and U.S. visas in
Kuala Lumpur from an unknown person. The other man claimed
to have been given the passport in Kuala Lumpur by his
parents. The English-speaking man provided an alleged home
address in Kuala Lumpur. It was impossible to verify the
true names and nationalities of any of the four. Identifying
information on the four is as follows:
SUBJECT 1:
Name on Passport: LAM, Chi Keung
DOB: 11-29-1950
Passport # A12439069
AKA: LOKE, Heng Yew
DOB: 11-05-1929
Address: D-0-27 Avant Court.
6 Mile Klang Road, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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SUBJECT 2:

Name on Passport: LAM, Yen Ling
DOB: 05-12-1985
Passport #:A13698168
AKA: LI ZU, Qing
DOB: 01-03-1983

SUBJECT 3:

Name on Passport: LAM, Chai Luan
DOB: 01-03-1983
Passport #:A13571946
AKA: LI ZI, Lin
DOB: 10-29-1983

SUBJECT 4:

Name on Passport: LOKE, Heng Yew
DOB: 07-05-1983
Passport #A14177495
AKA: CHEN, Rong
DOB: 07-05-1983


4. RSO removed the U.S. visas, all of which were allegedly
issued in Kuala Lumpur, from the passports. One bears foil
number 67713128 corresponding to a visa issued in Lisbon
while the other two had foils numbers 72308821 and 71313723
which could not be located in the CCD. The visas appear to
be very high quality fakes and have been forwarded to
DS/Visa Fraud for further analysis. Scans of the passports
and visas have been forwarded to CA/FPP. Names and AKAs have
been entered in CLASS. The subjects are still being held at
the Chilean International Airport. Immigration officials in
Buenos Aires refuse to accept the subjects.
YAMAUCHI

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