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Cablegate: Canada Nominees for "U.S. National Security

This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.

171150Z Oct 05

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 07 OTTAWA 003092

SIPDIS

STATE

FOR ECA/A/E/USS - BRIAN N. GIBSON; WHA/PDA - JANE CARPENTER-
ROCK
TORONTO FOR PAO; CALGARY FOR PA

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: KPAO OEXC SCUL CA
SUBJECT: Canada Nominees for "U.S. National Security
Policymaking in a Post-9-11 World" Institute, Jan 8-Feb 20,
2006

REFERENCE: State 149595

1. Summary: Mission Canada is pleased to nominate two
strong candidates, selected from among the Embassy and seven
consulates in Canada, for the subject U.S. Studies
Institute. Both play significant roles in educating future
leaders of Canada and stimulating public debate in Canada on
security and Canada-U.S. security cooperation in the
capitals of powerhouse provinces Ontario and Alberta and
beyond. Neither has significant first-hand U.S. experience.
Post provides nominating information below for Dr. Goran
Pesic, the first director of the University of Toronto's new
Council on Transatlantic Relations, and Dr. Kevin Haggerty,
Director of the Criminology Program at the University of
Alberta. We look forward to selection information. End
summary.

2. U.S. Consulate General Calgary nominee:

A) Name: Kevin Daniel Haggerty
B) Date of Birth: June, 10, 1965
C) City of Birth: Regina, Saskatchewan
D) Country of Birth: Canada
E) Country of Residence: Canada
F) Country of Citizenship: Canada
G) Home address: 11328 73rd Ave
Edmonton, Alberta
T6G 0C8, Canada
780-434-0801
kevin.haggerty@ualberta.ca
H) Gender: male
I) Dietary/health concerns: none

J) Current Position:
Director, Criminology Program
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Areas of Specialization: Policing and Security; Risk
Theory; Sociology of Science and Technology;
Surveillance; Research Ethics


K) Current Institutional Address:
Department of Sociology
University of Alberta
HM Tory Building
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2H4

L) Past Positions:

M) Education:
1998 Doctor of Philosophy (Sociology), University
of British Columbia

1992 Master of Arts (Criminology) University of
Toronto, Centre of Criminology

1990 Bachelor of Arts, Honours (Law: Concentration in
Criminology and Criminal Justice). Carleton University

N) Professional Memberships
Canadian Law and Society Association
Society for the Study of Social Problems
Canadian Sociological Association

O) Publications (selected):

Ericson, Richard V., and Kevin D. Haggerty. 1997. Policing
the Risk Society. Toronto: University of Toronto Press,
and Oxford: Oxford University Press (487 pages).

Haggerty, Kevin D. and Richard V. Ericson eds. The New
Politics of Surveillance and Visibility (forthcoming
2005) 670 manuscript pages

Erin Kruger and Kevin D. Haggerty. (forthcoming 2006)
"Intelligence Exchange in Policing and Security"
Policing and Society

Haggerty, Kevin D., and Amber Gazso. 2005 "Seeing Beyond the
Ruins: Surveillance as a Response to Terrorist
Threats." Canadian Journal of Sociology 30(2), 169-187

Haggerty, Kevin D. 2004. "Technology and Crime Policy."
Theoretical Criminology 8:221-227.

Haggerty, Kevin D., and Richard V. Ericson. 2000. "The
Surveillant Assemblage." British Journal of Sociology
51:605-22.

Haggerty, Kevin D. (forthcoming 2005). "Visible War:
Information War, Surveillance and Speed." in The New
Politics of Surveillance and Visibility, edited by
Kevin D. Haggerty and Richard V. Ericson. Toronto:
University of Toronto Press.

Ericson, Richard V., and Kevin D. Haggerty. 2002. "The
Policing of Risk." in Embracing Risk: The Changing
Culture of Insurance and Responsibility, edited by Tom
Baker and Jonathan Simon. Chicago: University of
Chicago Press.

Haggerty, Kevin D. (forthcoming 2006) `Risk Management'
Encyclopaedia of Police Science 3rd ed. Jack Green ed.
New York: Routledge

Q) Fluency: English is nominee's first language

R) Justification:

The University of Alberta is about to launch an
"Institute for United States Studies" (IUSS)-the first of
its kind in a province that takes its relationship with the
United States very seriously. In a country that has, up to
this point, not taken a systematic approach to the study of
the United States, the post finds this initiative a positive
sign that academics and administrators are focusing their
energies and their funding on a research and teaching
institute devoted to the United States. The IUSS in
Edmonton will be housed in the Faculty of Arts, will be
multi-disciplinary, and will focus on a variety of public
policy issues surrounding the very important Canada-U.S.
relationship.


Security will be an important focus, and Kevin Haggerty
is well-placed to direct this section of the IUSS. He is
keen to learn more about security efforts in the United
States following 9-11 (which he correctly says have
dramatically changed at a pace that make it difficult to
follow at times), and his participation in the Fulbright
Winter Institute will give him the background and first-hand
exposure to current issues in this field that will prepare
him well to develop the University of Alberta's innovative
program.

Canada and the United States arguably share the closest
security relationship in the world, with Canadian and
American forces side by side protecting North American air
space at NORAD, fighting terror and nurturing stability in
Afghanistan, and sharing intelligence daily to foil terror
and international crime. With a 5000-mile border, as the
U.S. Ambassador has said, we cannot secure our countries
without each other in the post-9-11 environment. Yet
Canadian public opinion towards U.S. foreign and security
policies has grown conflicted. Some view what they perceive
as U.S. unilateralism as reason to distance themselves from
U.S. international interventions. Some question the balance
between counterterrorism measures and personal privacies and
civil rights in the wake of the Patriot Act. The U.S.
deportation of Canadian-Syrian Maher Arar to Syria, where he
was imprisoned and allegedly tortured for nearly a year,
then released without charge, led to a public inquiry on the
Canadian government's role in his deportation, with the
public accusing the Canadian security and intelligence
services of improperly sharing information with Americans
and the U.S. of violating human rights. In this
environment, the Mission has worked hard to impress upon
Canadian opinion leaders the scale of the stakes in the war
on terror in the post-9-11 period. Arming Professor
Haggarty with the facts, perspectives and contacts to
accurately portray U.S. objectives, policies and approaches
in the field of security, intelligence and law enforcement
for emerging Canadian leaders in the University of Alberta's
pioneering U.S. Studies Center will address that goal.

S) Nominee's Personal Statement:

It almost appears as if the focus of this study
institute was crafted specifically to further my research
and teaching interests and advance institutional
developments at my university.

As the Director of the Criminology program at one of
Canada's premier research universities my professional
activities routinely address developments in American
security policy, both domestic and international. My
longstanding research program concentrates on issues of
security, intelligence and information technology. This
includes publications on the attractions and limitations of
new surveillance technologies as part of the war on
terrorism. I have written on recent developments in U.S.
military practice and also on the complex relationship
between organizational and technological developments in the
American military and domestic crime policy - a topic which
I think is particularly germane after 9/11. Some of my more
prominent works in this area include the co-authored book
Policing the Risk Society which was awarded special
recognition by the Herbert Jacob Book Prize committee of the
American Law and Society Association. I also have a
forthcoming co-edited book The New Politics of Surveillance
and Visibility (University of Toronto Press) which is
centrally concerned with security developments after 9/11. I
teach graduate and undergraduate courses where such issues
figure prominently, and as noted below, am eager to develop
two new courses that concentrate specifically on American
security policy.

I believe that my participation in this study institute
would allow me to benefit substantially in four specific
areas:


1) I am committed to continuing and expanding my research in
the area of U.S. security policy, with a particular emphasis
on the place of intelligence and information in security
practice. While I try to remain abreast of developments in
this area, after 9/11 policy change has been so far-reaching
and advanced at such speed that it can be difficult to
remain current. As such, I see the prospect of intensive
study in this area to be a true blessing and would expect
that my research would receive a monumental boost from such
an experience.

2) The University of Alberta is currently discussing a
faculty-wide initiative to develop an Institute on United
States Policy Development (IUSPD). My participation in this
seminar would allow me to solicit concrete advice from other
participants about how to best develop our proposal and to
fashion such an Institute.

3) I would also use this opportunity to further develop two
courses on U.S. security policy. The first is an
undergraduate course on American security policy (domestic
and international) that I envision as being a central
component of the IUSPD. The second would be a graduate
course concentrating specifically on developments in the
aftermath of 9/11.

4) Participation in this study institute would also provide
an excellent opportunity to fashion new research and
teaching collaborations with scholars with similar
interests.

While I would attend such an institute seeking to learn
as much as possible, I also believe that my research and
experience in this area would allow me to make informed
contributions to the discussions. Canadians are not
disinterested observers of American security policy, but are
actively involved in assorted trans-national security
collaborations, with Canada often following the American
lead on security matters. Hence, both I and my students
would benefit immensely from a more sophisticated
understanding of U.S. security policy - something that can
only benefit international relations more generally.
T) Action Officer:
Betty Rice, Public Affairs Field Representative, U.S.
Consulate General Calgary; Tel 403-444-5203; fax 403-266-
4743; Email ricebw@state.gov. Please copy CAO Elizabeth
Kauffman at kauffmanec@state.gov.

3) U.S. Consulate General Toronto Nominee:

A: NOMINEE'S FULL Name:
First name: Goran
Middle: Samuel
Last: Pesic

B. DATE OF BIRTH: 06-18-1972
C. CITY OF BIRTH: Vlasotince, Serbia and Montenegro
Nationality: Canadian (1980)

D. COUNTRY OF BIRTH: SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO

E. COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE: CANADA

F. COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP: CANADA (1980)

G. HOME ADDRESS, TELEPHONE AND E-MAIL:

85 DUNN, TORONTO, ONTARIO, M6K 28R CANADA
TEL: (416) 538-0607 CELL: (416) 824-2552
GORAN.PESIC@SYMPATICO.CA

H. GENDER: MALE

I. MEDICAL, PHYSICAL, DIETARY OR OTHER PERSONAL
CONSIDERATIONS: NONE

PROFESSIONAL INFORMATION

J. PRESENT POSITION AND TITLE: EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE
COUNCIL ON TRANSATLANTIC RELATIONS.

K. CURRENT INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION AND COMPLETE ADDRESS:

THE COUNCIL ON TRANSATLANTIC RELATIONS, UNIVERSITY OF
TORONTO, P.O. BOX 273, STATION F, TORONTO, ONTARIO M4Y 2H7.

L. WORK EXPERIENCE, INCLUDING PREVIOUS POSITIONS AND
TITLES:

JUNE 2002- MARCH 2005 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, THE ATLANTIC
COUNCIL OF CANADA

MAY 1997 - JUNE 2002 ONTARIO MINISTRY OF LABOUR, SENIOR
GOVERNMENT ANALYST

M. EDUCATION, ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL TRAINING, INCLUDING
DEGREES EARNED AND FIELDS OF SPECIALIZATION:

2000 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
BACHELOR OF ARTS (HON. B.A.),
POLITICAL SCIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

2001 PUBLIC SERVICE EXECUTIVE TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAM, OTTAWA, CANADA - CANADA CUSTOMS & REVENUE AGENCY,
CONTINUOUS PROCESS IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

2002-PRESENT THE COVENANT GROUP, TORONTO, CANADA
NUMEROUS MANAGEMENT, LEADERSHIP, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION
COURSES THROUGHOUT CAREER AS WELL AS RECEIVING ON-GOING
EXECUTIVE COACHING.


N. ACTIVE PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS:

SINCE 2002-CANADIAN INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
SINCE 2002-CANADIAN INSTITUTE FOR STRATEGIC STUDIES
INSTITUTIONAL
SINCE 2003-COMPAS GROUP INSTITUTE OF STUDIES ON DEFENCE
POLICY (DENMARK)
SINCE 2003-ROYAL CANADIAN MILITARY INSTITUTE

O. SHORT LIST OF RELEVANT PUBLICATIONS [NO MORE THAN FIVE
TO TEN CITATIONS]:

PESIC, GORAN S., ASSESSING CANADA'S NEW NATIONAL SECURITY
POLICY. THE TRANSATLANTIC QUARTERLY. THE ATLANTIC COUNCIL OF
CANADA, SUMMER 2004.

PESIC, GORAN S., THE FIRST YATA SEMINAR IN BRUSSELS. THE
TRANSATLANTIC QUARTERLY. THE ATLANTIC COUNCIL OF CANADA,
SPRING 2004.

BONNN, PREBEN. ET AL., TOWARDS A COMMON EUROPEAN SECURITY
AND DEFENCE POLICY: THE WAYS AND MEANS OF MAKING IT A
REALITY. BERLIN: LIT VERLAG, 2003. (ISBN 3-8258-6711-0.)

P. PREVIOUS TRAVEL AND STUDY OR RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN THE
UNITED STATES, INCLUDING DATES AND AN INDICATION AS TO
WHETHER SUCH TRAVEL WAS SUPPORTED BY U.S. GOVERNMENT FUNDS:

OCCASIONAL TOURIST AND CONFERENCE-RELATED TRAVEL, NO U.S.-
SUPPORTED TRAVEL.

Q. EVIDENCE OF FLUENCY IN WRITTEN AND ORAL ENGLISH (E.G.
PERSONAL INTERVIEW, TEST SCORE, ETC.): Native fluency.

R. RATIONALE:

Dr. Pesic was recently named Executive Director at the
Council on Transatlantic Relations, University of Toronto, a
new foreign policy institution that the Mission expects to
achieve many of the goals of the complementary Atlantic
Council of Canada he formerly led: to promote a broader and
deeper understanding of international peace and security
issues relating to NATO by engaging Canadians on Canada's
role in NATO and its commitment to transatlantic
cooperation. Dynamic and energetic in reaching out to both
traditional and younger groups, Dr. Pesic stimulates thought
on Canada's approach to security and cooperation among
Canada, the U.S., and their allies through exchanges,
seminars, articles and publications. He explores NATO
relationships and developments, cooperation in Europe, and
NORAD.

As the former executive director of the Atlantic Council of
Canada, Pesic was responsible for operations and
programming, conferences and the preparation of the Canadian
foreign policy publication "The Transatlantic Quarterly,"
which offers an overview and assessment of security
throughout the Western Hemisphere, the strategic and
economic dimensions, and North America's relationship and
role within the NATO Alliance. Further exposure to the U.S.
positions on security issues and foreign policy would boost
Dr. Pesic's effectiveness in spurring dialogue that will aid
the cooperation so essential to both our countries' security
and well-being.

Canada and the United States arguably share the closest
security relationship in the world, with Canadian and
American forces side by side protecting North American air
space at NORAD, fighting terror and nurturing stability in
Afghanistan, and cooperating on peacekeeping and security
missions worldwide. With a 5000-mile border, as the U.S.
Ambassador has said, we cannot secure our countries without
each other in the post-9-11 environment. Yet Canadian
public opinion towards U.S. foreign and security policies
has grown conflicted. Some view what they perceive as U.S.
unilateralism as reason to distance themselves from U.S.
international interventions. Some question the balance
between counterterrorism measures and personal privacies and
civil rights in the wake of the Patriot Act. And many
regard upgrades of the Canadian forces as unnecessary
expenses, opting to fund social services instead. In this
environment, the Mission has worked hard to impress upon
Canadian opinion leaders the scale of the stakes in the war
on terror. This nomination seeks to address that goal.

S. Dr. Pesic's personal statement:

I remember vividly my meeting at Parliament Hill on April
27, 2004 to listen to Canada's first comprehensive national
security policy - Securing an Open Society: Canada's
National Security Policy. A week prior to the announcement,
I received a call from the Privy Council Office inviting me
to attend a select meeting of security and defence community
experts to participate in a government's announcement on its
new national security policy. I was pleased be to part of
this historic moment in Canadian security policy history.

I began to take considerable interest in Canada's national
security position as well as its overall response in the
Post-9/11 era. This prompted me to write a report for the
Transatlantic Quarterly magazine entitled: Assessing
Canada's New National Security Policy. I did a
comprehensive survey of the existing literature, which
revealed that Canada was indeed slow to respond to U.S.
concerns over issues pertaining to national and
international security, particularly as it related to the
War on Terror, immigration and overall border control
issues. Although Canada did eventually begin to shift its
working priorities closer to U.S. national security policy
concerns, contentions in Canada-U.S. political and trade
relations continue to negatively influence Canadian public
opinion of our bilateral relationship with the U.S.

Having since closely observed these issues from my current
position as Executive Director of the Council on
Transatlantic Relations (CTR), (a Canadian-based think-tank
focusing on international policy research and analysis on
security and defence issues), I am concerned that the
current U.S. strategic defence message and its national
security policy concerns are not being adequately received
by Canadian policy-and-decision makers. This is similar to
the misperceptions and lack of understanding of the security
field within which NATO now operates - something that I have
been working hard to address.

Several weeks ago, I lead a high-level Canadian Delegation
to the European Union and NATO Headquarters. The intent of
this CTR Canadian Leaders Forum was to provide these
influential policy-makers and opinion leaders with an
overview of the new security challenges faced by the EU and
NATO, and the actions these organizations have taken to
address these new challenges and threats, as well as to
discuss Canada's role in the Fight Against Terrorism.

The group included, former Minister of Defence Mr. David
Pratt, Parliamentary Secretary for Transportation, the
Honourable Jim Karygiannis, a Managing Editor from the
National Post, a Director of the Canadian Defence and
Foreign Affairs Institute, a senior academic from University
of British Columbia as well as very senior executives from
firms such as Hill & Knowlton and Stratos Global
Corporation. They expressed a keen willingness to be message
multipliers to their domestic audiences and various
constituency groups. Given the successful outcome of this
event, I would like to repeat these efforts and direct them
toward bringing a similar calibre of Canadians to the U.S.
As such, the CTR is currently planning a Leaders Forum to
Washington, D.C. and NATO Transformation in Norfolk, VA,
sometime in late spring 2006.

Moreover, the CTR plans to organize three major events in
2006 focusing on the Canada-U.S. strategic relationship.
The first of these high-level events is a Roundtable
Conference entitled, "Evaluating Canada's National Security
Strategy Two Years Later-Perspectives from Ottawa and
Washington D.C." to be held in Ottawa in April/May 2006. The
second is an International Security Conference focusing on
Transportation and Security. This conference will closely
examine best practices in the Fight Against Terrorism. This
international event will be held in Toronto in early June
2006. The third event will focus on broader transatlantic
security issues and concerns. This Forum, entitled: "The
World of e-Borders-The E.U. Experience and the Canada and
U.S. Smart Border Strategy", will explore a several new
concepts in international security, including the
establishment of a transatlantic security perimeter as well
as emerging themes in "soft defence". It is scheduled to
take place in Ottawa in the late fall of 2006.

As a result of my extensive work in the Canadian security
and defence field, I have gained much knowledge of the
thematic issues involved in the post-9/11 era. However, I
am keen to further my knowledge and comprehension of
American views on what constitutes U.S. national security
and defence policy, and evolving methodologies from the
immediate post-Cold War period to the current War on Terror.

I believe that I would be a strong candidate in the program
as I have the specific interdisciplinary skills, which are
necessary to understand the nuances of advanced
policymaking. These skills were developed during my ten-year
association with the Atlantic Council of Canada and through
my international involvement with the Atlantic Treaty
Association.

I am also capable of contextualizing the various historical,
political, economic, cultural and geographic factors that
underpin the formulation of U.S. foreign and national
security policy. For example, I had a long working
relationship with Foreign Affairs Canada to place top-
calibre young Canadians graduates at leading Washington-
based think tanks to examine various international security
and defence related issues. I negotiated placements with the
Center for Strategic and International Studies, the Atlantic
Council of the United States, the Brookings Institute and
the Carnegie Centre for International Peace. Facilitating
these working relationships between the Government of
Canada, U.S. institutions and the appropriate candidates, I
had the opportunity to explore firsthand these key elements
of American policy-thinking.

I would be truly honoured to participate in the Winter
Institute's program on U.S. National Security Policymaking
in a Post- 9/11 World. The experience and knowledge I gain
from the program would filter beyond my own comprehension
and be used to develop CTR programming and discussions on
domestic and international security policy issues. Such
programming would aim at strengthening and enhancing
Canada-U.S. relations among senior policy-and-decision
makers, something that I believe would be extremely
beneficial to both our countries.

I thank you for your consideration.
Goran S. Pesic

T. Action Officer:
Nicholas Giacobbe, Public Affairs Officer, U.S. Consulate
General Toronto; Tel 415-595-1721; fax 416-595-5250; Email
giacobbenj@state.gov. Please copy CAO Elizabeth Kauffman at
kauffmanec@state.gov.

End nominations.

4) Post appreciates the opportunity to nominate candidates
for this very timely Institute.

WILKINS

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