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Cablegate: Condemnation of Dprk Missile Launches at Imo

VZCZCXYZ0005
PP RUEHWEB

DE RUEHLO #5476 2071310
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 261310Z JUL 06
FM AMEMBASSY LONDON
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 7737
INFO RUWDQAC/COMDT COGARD WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY

UNCLAS LONDON 005476

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

STATE FOR IO/T LAURENCE TOBEY AND ISN CHRISTOPHER
HERRINGTON, USCG FOR JEREMY CAIRL

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: EWWT PHSA PARM MOPS MCAP KN KS JA UK IMO
SUBJECT: CONDEMNATION OF DPRK MISSILE LAUNCHES AT IMO
CONFERENCE

REF: A. LONDON 5026

B. STATE 117380

1. Summary. USDel delivered the statement contained in Ref A
at the July 19 meeting of the IMO NAV 52 conference. USDel's
statement followed the Japanese intervention which condemned
the DPRK missile launches and was joined by statements of
concern from the Russian Federation, HMG, France, Italy,
Korea, and Finland. The DPRK representative responded in an
invective-filled discourse quoting heavily from a prepared
North Korean Foreign Ministry statement condemning the UNSC
and the USG. End Summary.

2. The Japanese delegation began the Other Business section
of NAV 52 by calling attention to the IMO Assembly's
resolution A 706(17) and MSC Circular 893 which recommends
all member States give prior notice of operations which might
endanger safety of navigation, expressly including missile
launches, and noted that North Korea failed to give such
notice prior to its missile launches earlier this month. The
Japanese delegation recalled that the DPRK did not provide
notification when it undertook similar tests in 1998. The
Japanese intervention stated that many fishing vessels were
threatened and the launches were a danger to marine
navigation. The Japanese delegation concluded by calling for
consideration by the Maritime Safety Committee at its next
meeting.

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3. The USdel then delivered the remarks contained in Ref A.
The U.S. was followed by the Russian Federation which
expressed "serious concern" over the danger to shipping posed
by the DPRK missile launches. Russia also urged IMO action
on the matter while expressing support for efforts to achieve
a peaceful conclusion to this situation. HMG largely echoed
the statements of the U.S. and Japanese delegations while
proposing the NAV 52 affirm its support for IMO resolution
A706(17) and call on all nations to respect it. France,
Italy, Korea and Finland also expressed concern over DPRK's
disregard for IMO resolutions and the threat to maritime
navigation posed by these unannounced missile launches.

4. The DPRK delegation responded with a statement accusing
Japan of slander and stating its right to launch missiles is
a sovereign matter not to be discussed in international fora.
The delegation went on to claim that the DPRK, when
undertaking sovereign action, is not bound by international
law or multilateral talks. The DPRK's representative then
quoted from a statement by the DPRK's Ministry of Foreign
Affairs condemning the UNSC resolution and stating the U.S.
created a dangerous situation on the Korean peninsula. The
NAV 52 chairman, Kees Polderman of the Netherlands,
interrupted and ended the North Korean intervention by
reminding the DPRK delegation that NAV 52 was a forum for
safety of navigation and not the appropriate venue to express
political opinions on UNSC resolutions.

5. At the end of the Other Business section NAV 52 agreed
with HMG's proposal and affirmed its support for IMO
resolution A706(17) and the need for nations to respect it.

6. This cable was cleared by the NAV 52 delegation.

Visit London's Classified Website:
http://www.state.sgov.gov/p/eur/london/index. cfm
Tuttle

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