Celebrating 25 Years of Scoop
Special: Up To 25% Off Scoop Pro Learn More

Search

 

Cablegate: Media Reaction: Western Hemisphere: Ecuador, U.S. Base In

VZCZCXYZ0009
OO RUEHWEB

DE RUEHSO #1223 3331628
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 291628Z NOV 06
FM AMCONSUL SAO PAULO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 6100
INFO RHEHNSC/NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL WASHDC IMMEDIATE
RUEHBR/AMEMBASSY BRASILIA PRIORITY 7183
RUEHRI/AMCONSUL RIO DE JANEIRO PRIORITY 7620
RUCPDOC/USDOC WASHDC 2634

UNCLAS SAO PAULO 001223

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

STATE INR/R/MR; IIP/R/MR; WHA/PD

DEPT PASS USTR

USDOC 4322/MAC/OLAC/JAFEE

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: KMDR OPRC OIIP ETRD BR
SUBJECT: MEDIA REACTION: WESTERN HEMISPHERE: ECUADOR, U.S. BASE IN
MANTA; SAO PAULO


1. "In Chvez's Club"

Liberal, largest national circulation daily Folha de S. Paulo
(11/29) editorialized: "Leftist Rafael Correa was elected Sunday the
eighth Ecuadorian president in the past ten years, and this shows
the level of political instability in that Andean nation....
Correa's party did not elect any congressmen.... It is almost
certain, therefore, that Correa, as happened with Hugo Chvez, of
whom he is an admirer and friend, will call a Constituent Assembly,
which may try to dissolve the Parliament.... Correa showed two faces
during the campaign. In the first round, he adopted a radical
discourse.... In the second, he moderated his tone. He repelled the
idea of changing the currency and made comments aimed at pleasing
investors. It is too soon to say which Correa will prevail. It is
most likely that, as Evo Morales did in Bolivia, Correa will act as
a populist nationalist domestically, and show himself more flexible
and conciliatory in foreign policy. Anyway, Brazilian diplomats
should be prepared to face difficulties resulting from a regional
reemergence of anti-imperialist caudillo-type politicians also in
Ecuador."

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

2. "A Moderate In Ecuador?"

An editorial in center-right O Estado de S. Paulo (11/29) remarked:
"Ecuadorian President elect Rafael Correa will face major
difficulties to have his most ambitious project approved: the call
of a Constituent Assembly to 're-found' Ecuador.... Correa has no
congressional bloc to support him.... Prudently, he established
priorities that have general support. He will not touch the nation's
[dollar] currency adopted in 2000.... He will accept productive
foreign capital.... He will try to join OPEC again and will look for
technical cooperation in Venezuela. But he will not adopt radical
measures against foreign companies, as Evo Morales did. Correa also
made clear that Ecuador will not ratify the free trade agreement
signed with the U.S., whose Congress has not yet ratified it
either.... And he will not renew with the U.S. the concession of the
Manta air base. The Rafael Correa who was elected does not have the
radical profile of the first round candidate. Let us hope that the
difficulties he will have to face do not throw him in the
Havana-Caracas-La Paz axis."

3."The U.S. Wanted To Enlarge The Base"

Political commentator Newton Carlos opined in liberal, largest
national circulation daily Folha de S. Paulo (11/29): "Ecuadorian
President elect Rafael Correa said he will not renew the concession
of the Mantra military base that the U.S. Southern Command is
currently operating in Ecuador. The concession was made in 1999
without the necessary Congressional hearing, and the original
project has been expanded with enlargement of runaways to permit the
landing of airborne troops. The official idea is to provide support
to Plan Colombia, fighting drug trafficking, which means unavoidable
involvement in counter-insurgence operations or of intervention in
the Colombian civil war.... Those who see Manta as a possible new
Guantanamo argue that the concession has in practice transformed the
base into a military enclave. U.S. military in Manta enjoy
diplomatic immunity, do not pay taxes and bear 'license to kill,'
according to his most radical opponents. The new Ecuadorian
president has promised to end all that."
McMullen

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
World Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.