Scoop has an Ethical Paywall
Work smarter with a Pro licence Learn More

Search

 

Cablegate: Tokyo Denies Request for Freedom Broadcasting From

VZCZCXRO2356
OO RUEHFK RUEHKSO RUEHNH RUEHVK
DE RUEHKO #6940 3460523
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 120523Z DEC 06
FM AMEMBASSY TOKYO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 9008
INFO RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING PRIORITY 5133
RUEHBY/AMEMBASSY CANBERRA PRIORITY 1921
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL PRIORITY 1230
RUEHFK/AMCONSUL FUKUOKA PRIORITY 9128
RUEHNH/AMCONSUL NAHA PRIORITY 1612
RUEHOK/AMCONSUL OSAKA KOBE PRIORITY 2559
RUEHKSO/AMCONSUL SAPPORO PRIORITY 0159
RUEHSH/AMCONSUL SHENYANG PRIORITY 0422
RUEHVK/AMCONSUL VLADIVOSTOK PRIORITY 0027
RUEHIN/AIT TAIPEI PRIORITY 6249
RHHMUNA/HQ USPACOM HONOLULU HI PRIORITY
RHMFIUU/COMUSJAPAN YOKOTA AB JA PRIORITY
RUAGAMS/COMUSKOREA SEOUL KOR PRIORITY
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK PRIORITY 2715
RUEAIIA/CIA WASHDC PRIORITY

UNCLAS TOKYO 006940

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: BBG PHUM PGOV JA KN KS
SUBJECT: TOKYO DENIES REQUEST FOR FREEDOM BROADCASTING FROM
JAPAN TO NORTH KOREA

REF: STATE 166931

1. (U) In response to reftel, on December 8, MOFA Asian and
Oceanian Affairs Bureau Northeast Asia Division Deputy
Director Yutaka Kashiwabara notified Embassy Political
Officer that Tokyo officials would not authorize foreign
(i.e. U.S.) radio broadcasts to North Korea from Japanese
territory. MOFA provided the following written response,
which had been coordinated with various Japanese government
agencies, including the Ministry of Internal Affairs and
Communications.

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

2. (U) Begin translation:

1. Japan,s Judicial System and Possibility of Broadcasts
from Japan by Persons from the U.S.

a) Foreign entities are restricted from investing in
Japanese broadcast companies. Therefore, U.S. broadcasters
and U.S. private groups cannot obtain a license to broadcast
in Japan. Based on Japan,s Radio Law (Article 5, paragraph
4), which outlines the restrictions on foreign investment by
foreign companies, licenses are not granted to: 1)
non-Japanese citizens, 2) a foreign government or its
representatives, 3) foreign corporate bodies or groups, 4)
any corporate body or group in which a person listed in
numbers 1-3 (above) serves as an executive, or in which
that/those individual(s) account for one fifth or more of the
right to vote.

b) In Japan, all medium-wave frequency bands are allocated
for domestic use. In accordance with the &Regional
Agreement Concerning the Use by the Broadcasting Service of
Frequencies in the Medium Frequency Bands in Regions 1 and 3
and in the Low Frequency Bands in Region 1,8 frequency bands
currently allocated for the Asian region have already become
saturated. Japan would need to seek consent from surrounding
countries in order to obtain a new frequency band for
international broadcasts and to change the existing frequency
for use in international broadcasts. Japanese officials
believe that obtaining this consent would be very difficult.
Therefore, the Japanese government considers that there is a
very slim chance that Japan,s medium-wave frequencies can be
used for broadcasting to North Korea.

2. Description of Japan,s &Shiokaze8 Radio Broadcasts to
the DPRK.
The Investigation Commission on Missing Japanese Probably
Related to North Korea (COMJAN), a private Japanese group,
beams a short wave program to the DPRK. COMJAN,s broadcasts
began in October 2005. Programs are transmitted for a total
of one hour per day. The broadcasts (in Japanese) target
abductees as well as missing individuals who are believed to
have been abducted. Additional broadcasts (in Korean,
English, Chinese, and Japanese) offer information relating to
abductees and news on the abduction issue. The program is
transmitted from a base station located in Taiwan by a
UK-owned broadcast telecom company, VT Communications. The
government of Japan does not provide financial support.

3. Other

As stated in paragraph one above, because all of Japan,s
medium-wave frequencies are allocated for domestic use, the
Japanese government has never examined the possibility of
using medium-wave frequencies to broadcast programs to the
DPRK. We understand that private groups use short-wave
frequencies for the same reason.
SCHIEFFER

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
World Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.