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Cablegate: Media Reaction; Kirchner's Address to the Unga; Argentine

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DE RUEHBU #1938/01 2701433
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 271433Z SEP 07
FM AMEMBASSY BUENOS AIRES
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 9368
INFO RHMFISS/CDR USSOCOM MACDILL AFB FL//SCJ2//
RULGPUA/USCOMSOLANT

UNCLAS BUENOS AIRES 001938

SIPDIS

STATE FOR INR/R/MR, I/GWHA, WHA, WHA/PDA, WHA/BSC,
WHA/EPSC
CDR USSOCOM FOR J-2 IAD/LAMA

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E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: KPAO OPRC KMDR PREL
SUBJECT: MEDIA REACTION; KIRCHNER'S ADDRESS TO THE UNGA; ARGENTINE
FIRST LADY SPEECH AT THE COA; ARGENTINA'S INTERNATIONAL TIES;
09/27/07

1. SUMMARY STATEMENT

Today's leading international stories include Argentine President
Nstor Kirchner's tough talk against Iran at the UNGA; chances that
Cristina Kirchner could be received by US President Bush if she wins
the Argentine presidency; the US business community reaction to
Senator and Presidential Candidate Cristina Kirchner's address to
the Council of the Americas; and Argentina's current international
relations.

2. OPINION PIECES AND EDITORIALS

- Iron fist against Iran"

Liberal, English-language "Buenos Aires Herald" editorializes
(09/27) "President Nstor Kirchner's tough talk against Iran at the
UNGA on Tuesday is all the more remarkable because there was no real
attempt at ideological balance by handing out a comparable
tongue-lashing to US President George W. Bush (increasingly the
choice target for criticism worldwide)... Kirchner did criticize
Bush's Iraq venture in 'I told you so' tones about the virtues of
multilateralism but this multilateral logic makes it all the more
incumbent on countries like Argentina to join in the crackdown
against Iran in order to avoid repeating unilateral errors...

"The tone of Kirchner's speech was in many ways dictated by its
context - by presences and absences alike. The only possible factor
modifying Kirchner's severity against Iran would be the latter's
newfound ally Hugo Chvez of Venezuela, whose fuel and cash
injections into Argentina have been increasingly valuable props for
the Kirchner presidency in recent years. But Chvez was strangely
absent... while Bush, who was present, was mute on the subject of
Iran, thus making it easier for Kirchner to criticize Iran without
going down any US-led warpath. This combination of factors plus the
presence of First Lady Cristina Fernndez de Kirchner (with her
carefully fostered ties with the New York Jewish community) should
make it no surprise if Kirchner's speech was stiffly worded enough
to satisfy all Jewish community leaders present.

"Nothing else in the speech (neither the compulsive criticisms of
the IMF nor the vague comments on UN Security Council reform) merit
further comment - even the anti-British statements did not go beyond
what could be expected from all weekend's media ripple over South
Atlantic territorial waters in the 25th anniversary of the Malvinas
war - but Kirchner's tough talk to Iran deserves praise for its
courage and clarity."

- "If Cristina wins, she could well be received by Bush"


Ana Barsn, Washington-based correspondent for leading "Clarn,"
comments (09/27) "After the distancing that resulted from the
Chvez-led anti-Bush rally in Argentina, a high-ranking US State
Department official acknowledged to 'Clarn' that it was they who
asked for a meeting between Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and
FM Jorge Taiana, which will happen tomorrow. Furthermore, the source
did not dismiss the possibility that if Cristina wins the election,
George W. Bush could receive her before she takes office.

"... 'Clarn' was able to confirm that the US is concerned over
'Iran's infiltration in Latin America and the way in which Chvez
convinced Evo Morales to re-establish ties to Tehran.' Because of
this, rather than because of what it could mean in the Middle East
conflict, Kirchner's anti-Iran posture is highly valued.

"The US will support the request for the capture of the Iranians at
Interpol because it managed to remove from the list the three
Iranians who were government officials (former president Al
Rafsanjani, former FM Al Akbar Velayati and former Ambassador Hadi
Solemainpour). (The US) does not want to set a precedent and pave
the way for the request of Donald Rumsfeld's capture, for example."

- "Many investors left bothered and with no responses"

Hugo Alconada Mon, Washington-based for daily-of-record "La Nacisn,"
writes (09/27) "... Neither Cristina's speech nor the Q&A session
included any mention of the situation at the INDEC national
statistics agency, price controls, the continuing defaulted debt nor
public utility rates, among other topics for which analysts sent
written questions but that no one ever read.

"This set off an apparent malaise among the guests. Daniel Kernel,
analyst for the Southern Cone for Eurasia Group, the world's leading
global political consulting firm, said: 'It was disrespectful. Her
address left as many doubts in the air as those we had before the
event.' 'We did not expect her to say much, but she could have


conveyed good signals, for example, about inflation or public
utility rates.'

"Other eight Wall Street analysts and businessmen consulted by 'La
Nacisn' after the luncheon repeated the same complaints, under
condition of anonymity. One of them said: 'Those who thought that
she was going to announce something strong were wrong, although the
good thing is that she showed a pro-business attitude, but she said
nothing about INDEC or holdouts and that was not good.'"

- "Globalization and Argentina's international relations"

Business-financial "Buenos Aires Econsmico-BAE" front-pages an
opinion piece by its editorial director and prestigious economist
Aldo Ferrer, who writes (09/27) "... In a global world, Argentina
should establish ties that are functional to the deployment of its
potential development... How to do this is a crucial dilemma for
which Argentina has two alternate possibilities, one coming from
neo-liberalism and the other towards the achievement of national
development.

"... Argentina is currently a country that respects international
law; it has regained control over its own destiny in a global world
and has confirmed its democratic form of government.

"International relations are not idyllic, and conflicts could
naturally appear between Argentina and other countries in the
defense of national interests on issues such as the environment,
IPR, finances or the trade regime. These are normal problems and
under no circumstances involve any risk of rupture with any country
or pose a threat to Argentine interests. The country's current
international ties are functional to the deployment of its potential
development and to an effective and realistic defense of its
sovereignty."

To see more Buenos Aires reporting, visit our
classified website at:
http://www.state.sqov.gov/p/wha/buenosaires

WAYNE

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