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Cablegate: Media Reaction: U.S-Japan-China, U.S. Burma Policy, China

VZCZCXRO3988
RR RUEHCN RUEHGH RUEHVC
DE RUEHBJ #2372 2290840
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 170840Z AUG 09
FM AMEMBASSY BEIJING
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 5682
INFO RUEHOO/CHINA POSTS COLLECTIVE
RHMFIUU/CDR USPACOM HONOLULU HI

UNCLAS BEIJING 002372

DEPARTMENT FOR INR/R/MR, EAP/CM, EAP/PA, EAP/PD, C
HQ PACOM FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR (J007)
SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL ECON KMDR OPRC CH

SUBJECT: MEDIA REACTION: U.S-JAPAN-CHINA, U.S. BURMA POLICY, CHINA
TRADE RELATIONS

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Editorial Quotes
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1. U.S-JAPAN-CHINA

"The U.S. does not need to use 'Japan's nuclear weapons' to deter
China"

The official Communist Party international news publication Global
Times (Huanqiu Shibao) (08/17): "At Japan's insistence, the U.S. has
promised to provide 'nuclear protection' to Japan. The U.S. also
did this in order to dissipate Japanese ambitions to develop nuclear
weapons. Preventing Japan from getting out of control and even
again joining an opposition against the U.S. is a central part of
the U.S.'s long-term strategic considerations vis-`-vis Japan.
There is little possibility that the U.S. would allow Japan to
develop nuclear weapons. Thus, the former Speaker of the U.S. House
of Representatives' comment that one day China will have to choose
between a denuclearized North Korea and a nuclear-armed Japan is
only an attempt to put more pressure on China. On the one hand, the
U.S. says North Korea's nuclear threat is not really that serious;
but, on the other hand, the U.S. hypes the danger of Japan's nuclear
armament in an attempt to corner China. China will not be pressured
into changing its stance on the North Korean nuclear issue. Thus,
the U.S. does not need to use the 'Japan card' to deter China."

2. U.S. BURMA POLICY

"Another example of 'smart power'"

The China Radio International sponsored newspaper World News Journal
(Shijie Xinwenbao) (08/17): "U.S. Senator Jim Webb's visit to Burma
has political implications. It demonstrates that the U.S.
government's policy of sanctioning Burma has changed into one of
'contact and dialogue.' The improvement in U.S.-Burma relations is
not only helpful for the U.S. to obtain Burmese oil resources, but
also to strengthen the U.S.'s presence in Southeast Asia to counter
China's influence in the region. The U.S. policy change with regard
to Burma is another example of Secretary Clinton's 'smart power.'
Obama is using 'smart power' to deal with hostile countries,
including Cuba, Venezuela, and North Korea. The U.S. government has
realized that suppressing Burma will not help win that country over.
Besides, Burma's recent 'close contact' with North Korea,
especially in the military arena, concerns the U.S. Analysts
believe that if the U.S. continues to isolate Burma, in a few years
Burma will become the second North Korea and it will be too late
then for the U.S. to change policy."

3. CHINA TRADE RELATIONS

"Not all of China's trade disputes are bad"

The official Xinhua News Agency international news publication
International Herald Leader (Guoji Xianqu Daobao) (08/17): "The U.S.
is the country that has the most trade disputes with China.
Although the U.S. has always made a lot of noise about these
disputes, they can usually be resolved smoothly. Resolving trade
disputes has helped China become more and more of a market economy.
Indeed, trade disputes can help China re-examine and reflect on its
economic development model, which is currently too dependent on
exports. The basic way to resolve these trade disputes is for China
to decrease exports and increase domestic demand. This is also the
best method for achieving sustainable economic development in China.
Even if China succeeds in shifting to a more domestic demand-driven
economy, trade disputes may still exist, albeit in a slightly
different form. When China's economy depends more on consumption
than on exports, China will increasingly play the role of the
plaintiff in trade disputes rather than the passive role of the
defendant."


GOLDBERG

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
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