Search

 

Cablegate: (U) U.N. General Debate Continues (September 24,

VZCZCXYZ0000
RR RUEHWEB

DE RUCNDT #0932/01 2932335
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 202335Z OCT 09
FM USMISSION USUN NEW YORK
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 7393
INFO RUEHAC/AMEMBASSY ASUNCION 0001
RUEHGB/AMEMBASSY BAGHDAD 0703
RUEHJL/AMEMBASSY BANJUL 0091
RUEHCV/AMEMBASSY CARACAS 0391
RUEHDR/AMEMBASSY DAR ES SALAAM 0325
RUEHGE/AMEMBASSY GEORGETOWN 0126
RUEHLG/AMEMBASSY LILONGWE 0066
RUEHLJ/AMEMBASSY LJUBLJANA 0107
RUEHRA/AMEMBASSY RIGA 0052
RUEHSJ/AMEMBASSY SAN JOSE 0228

UNCLAS USUN NEW YORK 000932

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: CS ECON GA GY IZ LG MI PA PGOV PREL SI TZ
UNGA, VE
SUBJECT: (U) U.N. GENERAL DEBATE CONTINUES (SEPTEMBER 24,
PM)

1. (U) Summary: Speeches in the afternoon session of the
second day of the UNGA General Debate (September 24)
continued with some familiar topics. Latin American leaders
from Venezuela, Costa Rica, and Paraguay all condemned the
coup in Honduras. Most of the speakers called for reform of
the United Nations with a focus on the Security Council.
Climate change was also raised. Both Slovenia and Guyana
called on the United Nations to organize a new Bretton Woods
conference. Most also addressed the need to solve the
Palestinian problem. Full text of statements is available at
un.org/ga/64/generaldebate, video archives are at
un.org/webcast/2009html. End Summary

2. (U) Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez began by promoting a
new film by Oliver Stone, "South of the Border." Chavez
encouraged everyone to see the film-if the capitalist theater
monopolies do not keep it from being shown. For the balance
of the speech, Chavez extolled the unique virtues of
Bolivarian Socialism. At one point, he complimented
President Obama and said he prayed God would protect him.
After receiving a large round of applause for this comment,
Chavez added that the dais no longer smelled like sulfur, but
now smelled like hope. However, Chavez asked several times,
"How many Obamas, are there?" Chavez explained that there
are, in fact, two "Obamas"-the one who spoke at the United
Nations and called for international cooperation, and another
who built bases in Colombia and maintains an embargo on Cuba.
He asked the Obama who spoke at the United Nations to "come
over to the socialist side" and "join the axis of evil."
Chavez condemned the coup in Honduras and claimed that it was
initiated by the Pentagon, which he said operates
independently around the world outside the control of the
U.S. Government. Chavez concluded by saying that capitalism
caused climate change and that the world needs an entirely
new system.

3. (U) Slovenian President Danilo Turk stated that the world
needs a comprehensive strategy to address climate in
accordance with the principle of common, but differentiated
responsibilities. He called on the United Nations and the
G-20 to lead the way to financial stability and insisted the
Bretton Woods organizations be adjusted. Turk also described
four issues facing the United Nations: structural change
(especially Security Council reform), a strengthened U.N.
role in peacekeeping operations,
disarmament/non-proliferation, and the United Nations,
continued role as a forum for international consultations.
He described the situation in Afghanistan as an example of a
crisis where the United Nations can play a vital role.

4. (U) President Bharat Jagdeo of Guyana said the global
financial crisis hit small Caribbean nations harder than most
because of their dependence on commodities. He called for a
global commission to restructure debt and for the United
Nations to hold a new Bretton Woods conference. Jagdeo
lastly addressed climate change and warned that the world
must stop deforestation now, as opposed to waiting until
2030.

5. (U) Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez regretted
the evils of defense spending and the international arms
trade. He said that money and human resources currently
spent on defense should be refocused on the problems facing
the world, such as climate change. He claimed that national
militaries serve no purpose but to suppress their own people.
He diagnosed that developing countries in Latin America face
three national challenges: strengthening their democracies,
developing their people through arms reduction, and creating
a new international order to combat climate change. Arias
said that Latin America's civil structure is hollow and needs
to build democratic institutions.

6. (U) President Fernando Mendez of Paraguay struck much the
same tone as the President of Costa Rica. He spoke about the
evils of defense spending and the international arms trade,
claiming that war and defense spending enrich developed
nations but harm developing nations. Mendez described the
need for a new economic world order that would strengthen
small economies, develop democratic institutions, end
criminal aggression against the environment, find peaceful
solutions to conflicts, and eliminate gender discrimination.


He also called for the end of the United States, embargo
against Cuba and condemned the coup in Honduras. Mendez
concluded by expressing his fears of an arms race in Latin
America.

7. (U) Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete pressed for
agricultural technology assistance for Africa as a means to
address climate change. He extolled the virtues of youth
employment programs in Africa, noting that unemployed youths
feed violence. He commended progress (but wanted to see
more) on the Millennium Development Goals and publicized the
meeting on maternal and child health and the African Leaders
Malaria Alliance. He expressed support for a two state
solution for the Palestinians and asked that the people of
Western Sahara be allowed to choose their own future. He
further called for reform in the Security Council. Kikwete
closed by asking for assistance with Tanzania,s refugee
problem and support for developing democratic institutions in
Africa.

8. (U) Latvian President Valdis Zatlers said the world must
focus on the three crisis "E's" (energy, economy, and
environment) and the three crisis "F's" (finance, food, and
fuel). He said that countries must not work strictly for
self-interest and extolled the virtues of the Millennium
Development Goals. Zatlers stated that each nation should
contribute to the fight against climate change according to
its own capabilities. He called for continued support for
peace and stability in Afghanistan and the Middle East. He
reiterated Latvia's support for Georgia and complained about
human rights abuses in Iran after the elections. Zatlers
reaffirmed support for the Geneva Convention and the
International Criminal Court. He reminded the General
Assembly of the review of the Human Rights Council in 2011
and said it would be a good time to strengthen the
organization. He also called for Security Council reform and
said that the United Nations must prioritize its budget and
make it more transparent and disciplined.

9. (U) The President of Malawi, Bingu Mutharika, called for
strengthened multilateralism and expressed the need to reform
the structure of the United Nations (particularly the
Security Council), spur international action on food
security, and bolster international cooperation in addressing
climate change. Mutharika closed by calling for a global
dialogue on democracy and its institutions.

10. (U) Iraqi President Jala Talabani spoke about political
and economic progress in Iraq. He requested that nations
currently hosting Iraqi refugees enable and encourage them to
return home. He said the Iraqi government has already
started creating a welcoming environment at home. He said
that the real threat to Iraq is external, and he requested a
Security Council investigation into the August 19 Baghdad
bombings. Talabani asked that the current Security Council
resolutions against Iraq be removed because Iraq is working
to address its needs bilaterally, so the resolutions are no
longer necessary. He requested that the United Nations
increase its engagement in Iraq. Talabani endorsed the
struggle of the Palestinian people and called for the Middle
East to become a nuclear free zone.

11. (U) Gambian President Yahya Jammeh blamed Africa,s
problems on large western multi-national corporations and
debt. He said that the lack of development in Africa is not
Africa's fault and that Africa can do little to help itself.
Jammeh cautioned that there will be consequences if the
situation does not improve. He called for a speedy
resolution of the plight of the Palestinians, Taiwan's
inclusion in the United Nations, the lifting of the U.S.
embargo on Cuba, support for Morocco's plan in Western
Sahara, and Security Council reform.

Wolff

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
World Headlines

 

OECD: COVID-19 Crisis Puts Migration And Progress On Integration At Risk, Says

Watch the live webcast of the press conference Migration flows have increased over the past decade and some progress has been made to improve the integration of immigrants in the host countries. But some of these gains may be erased by the COVID-19 pandemic ... More>>


Pacific Media Watch: How Pacific Environmental Defenders Are Coping With The Covid Pandemic

SPECIAL REPORT: By Sri Krishnamurthi of Pacific Media Watch Pacific Climate Warriors - creative action to trigger better responses to climate crisis. Image: ... More>>

Reporters Without Borders: Julian Assange’s Extradition Hearing Marred By Barriers To Open Justice

After monitoring four weeks of evidence in the US extradition proceedings against Wikileaks publisher Julian Assange, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) reiterates concern regarding the targeting of Assange for his contributions to journalism, and calls ... More>>

OHCHR: Stranded Migrants Need Safe And Dignified Return – UN Migrant Workers Committee

The UN Committee on Migrant Workers has today called on governments to take immediate action to address the inhumane conditions of migrant workers who are stranded in detention camps and ensure they can have an orderly, safe and dignified return to ... More>>